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dc.contributor.authorXu, Jason
dc.contributor.authorBjörnsson, Einar S.
dc.contributor.authorSundaram, Vinay
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-06T13:12:17Z
dc.date.available2018-06-06T13:12:17Z
dc.date.issued2018-02
dc.date.submitted2018
dc.identifier.citationSevere cholestatic hepatitis due to large vessel vasculitis: report of two cases 2015:gov061 Gastroenterology Reporten
dc.identifier.issn2052-0034
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/gastro/gov061
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/620577
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article, please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field or click on the hyperlink at the top of the page marked Filesen
dc.description.abstractGiant cell arteritis (GCA) is a vasculitis of medium and large sized vessels that occurs most often in people > 50 years of age with associated symptoms of fever, weight loss, headache and jaw claudication. Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR), which is characterized by aching and stiffness in the shoulders, hip girdle, neck and torso, is intimately associated with GCA, and evidence suggests that GCA and PMR are two phases of the same disease. The occurrence of liver enzyme abnormalities in either of these conditions is rare. Furthermore, as these conditions occur most commonly in the elderly population who may be subject to polypharmacy, patients with elevated aminotransferases due to underlying GCA/PMR may mistakenly have their abnormal liver function tests attributed to drug-induced liver injury. Given the potential complications of these diseases if left untreated, including ischemic stroke and blindness, early recognition and treatment are critical. We report two patients who developed severe cholestatic liver enzyme elevation, which had been initially attributed to drug toxicity, but was ultimately caused by large vessel vasculitis, specifically GCA and PMR.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttps://academic.oup.com/gastro/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/gastro/gov061en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Gastroenterology Reporten
dc.subjectÆðabólguren
dc.subjectLifrarsjúkdómaren
dc.subjectHepatitisen
dc.subjectEND12en
dc.subject.meshVasculitisen
dc.subject.meshHepatitisen
dc.subject.meshLiver Diseasesen
dc.titleSevere cholestatic hepatitis due to large vessel vasculitis: report of two casesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department[ 1 ] Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Dept Med, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Show more [ 2 ] Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Dept Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 3 ] Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 4 ] Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Show more [ 5 ] Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Comprehens Transplant Ctr, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USAen
dc.identifier.journalGastroenterology Reporten
dc.rights.accessOpen Access - Opinn aðganguren
dc.departmentcodeEND12
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-12T17:14:52Z
html.description.abstractGiant cell arteritis (GCA) is a vasculitis of medium and large sized vessels that occurs most often in people > 50 years of age with associated symptoms of fever, weight loss, headache and jaw claudication. Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR), which is characterized by aching and stiffness in the shoulders, hip girdle, neck and torso, is intimately associated with GCA, and evidence suggests that GCA and PMR are two phases of the same disease. The occurrence of liver enzyme abnormalities in either of these conditions is rare. Furthermore, as these conditions occur most commonly in the elderly population who may be subject to polypharmacy, patients with elevated aminotransferases due to underlying GCA/PMR may mistakenly have their abnormal liver function tests attributed to drug-induced liver injury. Given the potential complications of these diseases if left untreated, including ischemic stroke and blindness, early recognition and treatment are critical. We report two patients who developed severe cholestatic liver enzyme elevation, which had been initially attributed to drug toxicity, but was ultimately caused by large vessel vasculitis, specifically GCA and PMR.


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