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dc.contributor.authorIngadottir, Arora R
dc.contributor.authorBeck, Anne M
dc.contributor.authorBaldwin, Christine
dc.contributor.authorWeekes, C Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorGeirsdottir, Olof G
dc.contributor.authorRamel, Alfons
dc.contributor.authorGislason, Thorarinn
dc.contributor.authorGunnarsdottir, Ingibjorg
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-06T15:04:58Z
dc.date.available2018-06-06T15:04:58Z
dc.date.issued2018-03
dc.date.submitted2018
dc.identifier.citationAssociation of energy and protein intakes with length of stay, readmission and mortality in hospitalised patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. 2018, 119 (5):543-551 Br. J. Nutr.en
dc.identifier.issn1475-2662
dc.identifier.pmid29508694
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0007114517003919
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/620578
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink belowen
dc.description.abstractLow energy and protein intakes have been associated with an increased risk of malnutrition in outpatients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We aimed to assess the energy and protein intakes of hospitalised COPD patients according to nutritional risk status and requirements, and the relative contribution from meals, snacks, drinks and oral nutritional supplements (ONS), and to examine whether either energy or protein intake predicts outcomes. Subjects were COPD patients (n 99) admitted to Landspitali University Hospital in 1 year (March 2015-March 2016). Patients were screened for nutritional risk using a validated screening tool, and energy and protein intake for 3 d, 1-5 d after admission to the hospital, was estimated using a validated plate diagram sheet. The percentage of patients reaching energy and protein intake ≥75 % of requirements was on average 59 and 37 %, respectively. Malnourished patients consumed less at mealtimes and more from ONS than lower-risk patients, resulting in no difference in total energy and protein intakes between groups. No clear associations between energy or protein intake and outcomes were found, although the association between energy intake, as percentage of requirement, and mortality at 12 months of follow-up was of borderline significance (OR 0·12; 95 % CI 0·01, 1·15; P=0·066). Energy and protein intakes during hospitalisation in the study population failed to meet requirements. Further studies are needed on how to increase energy and protein intakes during hospitalisation and after discharge and to assess whether higher intake in relation to requirement of hospitalised COPD patients results in better outcomes.
dc.description.sponsorshipIcelandic Research Fund of the Icelandic Centre for Research University of Iceland Research Fund Landspitali University Hospital Research Funden
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.cambridge.org/core/services/aop-cambridge-core/content/view/66171BA19C429D4EB146876DFF19C8F4/S0007114517003919a.pdf/association_of_energy_and_protein_intakes_with_length_of_stay_readmission_and_mortality_in_hospitalised_patients_with_chronic_obstructive_pulmonary_disease.pdfen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.researchgate.net/profile/Arora_Ros/publication/323578510_Association_of_energy_and_protein_intakes_with_length_of_stay_readmission_and_mortality_in_hospitalised_patients_with_chronic_obstructive_pulmonary_disease/links/5aa13e0e0f7e9badd9a42d47/Association-of-energy-and-protein-intakes-with-length-of-stay-readmission-and-mortality-in-hospitalised-patients-with-chronic-obstructive-pulmonary-disease.pdfen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The British journal of nutritionen
dc.subjectNæringarskorturen
dc.subjectMataræðien
dc.subjectLungnasjúkdómaren
dc.subjectNUR12en
dc.subjectPAD12en
dc.subject.meshProtein-Energy Malnutritionen
dc.subject.meshMalnutritionen
dc.subject.meshPulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructiveen
dc.subject.meshInpatientsen
dc.titleAssociation of energy and protein intakes with length of stay, readmission and mortality in hospitalised patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department1 ] Landspitali Univ Hosp, Unit Nutr Res, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 2 ] Univ Iceland, Fac Food Sci & Nutr, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 3 ] Landspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Nutr, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland [ 4 ] Metropolitan Univ Coll, Fac Hlth & Technol, Dept Nutr & Hlth, DK-2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark [ 5 ] Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Res Unit Nutr, DK-2820 Gentofte, Denmark Show more [ 6 ] Kings Coll London, Div Diabet & Nutr Sci, London SE1 9NH, England Show more [ 7 ] Landspitali Univ Hosp, Iceland Gerontol Res Inst, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 8 ] Univ Iceland, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 9 ] Univ Iceland, Fac Med, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 10 ] Landspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Resp Med & Sleep, IS-108 Reykjavik, Icelanden
dc.identifier.journalThe British journal of nutritionen
dc.rights.accessLandspitali Access - LSH-aðganguren
dc.departmentcodeNUR12, PAD12
html.description.abstractLow energy and protein intakes have been associated with an increased risk of malnutrition in outpatients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We aimed to assess the energy and protein intakes of hospitalised COPD patients according to nutritional risk status and requirements, and the relative contribution from meals, snacks, drinks and oral nutritional supplements (ONS), and to examine whether either energy or protein intake predicts outcomes. Subjects were COPD patients (n 99) admitted to Landspitali University Hospital in 1 year (March 2015-March 2016). Patients were screened for nutritional risk using a validated screening tool, and energy and protein intake for 3 d, 1-5 d after admission to the hospital, was estimated using a validated plate diagram sheet. The percentage of patients reaching energy and protein intake ≥75 % of requirements was on average 59 and 37 %, respectively. Malnourished patients consumed less at mealtimes and more from ONS than lower-risk patients, resulting in no difference in total energy and protein intakes between groups. No clear associations between energy or protein intake and outcomes were found, although the association between energy intake, as percentage of requirement, and mortality at 12 months of follow-up was of borderline significance (OR 0·12; 95 % CI 0·01, 1·15; P=0·066). Energy and protein intakes during hospitalisation in the study population failed to meet requirements. Further studies are needed on how to increase energy and protein intakes during hospitalisation and after discharge and to assess whether higher intake in relation to requirement of hospitalised COPD patients results in better outcomes.


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