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dc.contributor.authorClausen, M.
dc.contributor.authorJonasson, K.
dc.contributor.authorKeil, T.
dc.contributor.authorBeyer, K.
dc.contributor.authorSigurdardottir, S. T.
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-04T14:34:44Z
dc.date.available2018-07-04T14:34:44Z
dc.date.issued2018-06
dc.date.submitted2018
dc.identifier.citationFish oil in infancy protects against food allergy in Iceland-Results from a birth cohort study 2018, 73 (6):1305 Allergyen
dc.identifier.issn01054538
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/all.13385
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/620636
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article, please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field or click on the hyperlink at the top of the page marked Filesen
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Consumption of oily fish or fish oil during pregnancy, lactation and infancy has been linked to a reduction in the development of allergic diseases in childhood. METHODS: In an observational study, Icelandic children (n = 1304) were prospectively followed from birth to 2.5 years with detailed questionnaires administered at birth and at 1 and 2 years of age, including questions about fish oil supplementation. Children with suspected food allergy were invited for physical examinations, allergic sensitization tests, and a double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge if the allergy testing or clinical history indicated food allergy. The study investigated the development of sensitization to food and confirmed food allergy according to age and frequency of postnatal fish oil supplementation using proportional hazards modelling. RESULTS: The incidence of diagnosed food sensitization was significantly lower in children who received regular fish oil supplementation (relative risk: 0.51, 95% confidence interval: 0.32-0.82). The incidence of challenge-confirmed food allergy was also reduced, although not statistically significant (0.57, 0.30-1.12). Children who began to receive fish oil in their first half year of life were significantly more protected than those who began later (P = .045 for sensitization, P = .018 for allergy). Indicators of allergy severity decreased with increased fish oil consumption (P = .013). Adjusting for parent education and allergic family history did not change the results. CONCLUSION: Postnatal fish oil consumption is associated with decreased food sensitization and food allergies in infants and may provide an intervention strategy for allergy prevention.
dc.description.sponsorshipEuropean Commission Landspitali University Hospital Science Fund GlaxoSmithKline Icelanden
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/all.13385en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Allergyen
dc.subjectFæðuofnæmien
dc.subjectLýsien
dc.subjectUngbörnen
dc.subjectMeðgangaen
dc.subjectPED12en
dc.subjectAAI12en
dc.subject.meshFood Hypersensitivityen
dc.subject.meshFish Oilsen
dc.subject.meshInfanten
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen
dc.titleFish oil in infancy protects against food allergy in Iceland-Results from a birth cohort studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department[ 1 ] Landspitali Univ Hosp, Childrens Hosp, Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 2 ] Univ Iceland, Sch Engn & Nat Sci, Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 3 ] Charite Univ Med Berlin, Inst Social Med Epidemiol & Hlth Econ, Berlin, Germany Show more [ 4 ] Charite Univ Med Berlin, Dept Paediat Pneumol & Immunol, Berlin, Germany Show more [ 5 ] Landspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Immunol, Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 6 ] Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Icelanden
dc.identifier.journalAllergyen
dc.rights.accessOpen Access - Opinn aðganguren
dc.contributor.institutionChildren's Hospital; Landspitali University Hospital; Reykjavik Iceland
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Engineering and Natural Sciences; University of Iceland; Reykjavík Iceland
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Social Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Economics; Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin; Berlin Germany
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Paediatric Pneumology and Immunology; Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin; Berlin Germany
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Immunology; Landspitali University Hospital; Reykjavik Iceland
dc.departmentcodePED12
dc.departmentcodeAAI12
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-12T15:17:53Z
html.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Consumption of oily fish or fish oil during pregnancy, lactation and infancy has been linked to a reduction in the development of allergic diseases in childhood. METHODS: In an observational study, Icelandic children (n = 1304) were prospectively followed from birth to 2.5 years with detailed questionnaires administered at birth and at 1 and 2 years of age, including questions about fish oil supplementation. Children with suspected food allergy were invited for physical examinations, allergic sensitization tests, and a double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge if the allergy testing or clinical history indicated food allergy. The study investigated the development of sensitization to food and confirmed food allergy according to age and frequency of postnatal fish oil supplementation using proportional hazards modelling. RESULTS: The incidence of diagnosed food sensitization was significantly lower in children who received regular fish oil supplementation (relative risk: 0.51, 95% confidence interval: 0.32-0.82). The incidence of challenge-confirmed food allergy was also reduced, although not statistically significant (0.57, 0.30-1.12). Children who began to receive fish oil in their first half year of life were significantly more protected than those who began later (P = .045 for sensitization, P = .018 for allergy). Indicators of allergy severity decreased with increased fish oil consumption (P = .013). Adjusting for parent education and allergic family history did not change the results. CONCLUSION: Postnatal fish oil consumption is associated with decreased food sensitization and food allergies in infants and may provide an intervention strategy for allergy prevention.


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