Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorIngason, Arnar B.
dc.contributor.authorSigfusson, Gunnlaugur
dc.contributor.authorTorfason, Bjarni
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-04T15:18:56Z
dc.date.available2018-07-04T15:18:56Z
dc.date.issued2018-06-07
dc.date.submitted2018
dc.identifier.citationCongenital aortic stenosis due to unicuspid unicommissural aortic valve: a case report 2018, 13 (1) Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgeryen
dc.identifier.issn1749-8090
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13019-018-0755-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/620637
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article, please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field or click on the hyperlink at the top of the page marked Filesen
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Unicuspid unicommissural aortic valve is an extremely rare congenital anomaly that usually presents in adulthood but can rarely present in infancy. We report a 17-year-old patient with congenital aortic stenosis secondary to unicuspid unicommissural aortic valve that was successfully treated with aortic valve replacement. CASE PRESENTATION: The patient was diagnosed with aortic stenosis after a murmur was heard in the newborn nursery and subsequently underwent aortic balloon valvuloplasty 6 weeks after birth. He had been regularly followed up since and underwent numerous cardiac catheterizations, including another aortic balloon valvuloplasty at age 13. During follow-up at age 17, the patient presented with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis and mild left ventricular hypertrophy. Aortic valve replacement was planned since the patient was nearly adult-sized and to reduce the risk of cardiac decompensation. During the operation an unicuspid unicommissural aortic valve was revealed. The patient recovered well post-operatively. He was discharged 5 days after the surgery in good condition and was completely symptom-free at follow-up 6 weeks later. CONCLUSIONS: Unicuspid aortic valve is a rare congenital anomaly that can cause congenital aortic stenosis. It is seldom diagnosed pre-operatively but should be suspected in infants presenting with aortic stenosis.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttps://cardiothoracicsurgery.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13019-018-0755-0en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgeryen
dc.subjectHjartasjúkdómaren
dc.subjectHjartagallaren
dc.subjectHjartalokuren
dc.subjectPED12en
dc.subjectTAS12en
dc.subject.meshAortic Valve Stenosisen
dc.titleCongenital aortic stenosis due to unicuspid unicommissural aortic valve: a case reporten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department1 ] Univ Iceland, Dept Med, Vatnsmyrarvegur 16, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 2 ] Landspitali Univ Hosp, Childrens Hosp, Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 3 ] Landspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiothorac Surg, Reykjavik, Icelanden
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Cardiothoracic Surgeryen
dc.rights.accessOpen Access - Opinn aðganguren
dc.departmentcodePED12
dc.departmentcodeTAS12
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-12T17:23:21Z
html.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Unicuspid unicommissural aortic valve is an extremely rare congenital anomaly that usually presents in adulthood but can rarely present in infancy. We report a 17-year-old patient with congenital aortic stenosis secondary to unicuspid unicommissural aortic valve that was successfully treated with aortic valve replacement. CASE PRESENTATION: The patient was diagnosed with aortic stenosis after a murmur was heard in the newborn nursery and subsequently underwent aortic balloon valvuloplasty 6 weeks after birth. He had been regularly followed up since and underwent numerous cardiac catheterizations, including another aortic balloon valvuloplasty at age 13. During follow-up at age 17, the patient presented with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis and mild left ventricular hypertrophy. Aortic valve replacement was planned since the patient was nearly adult-sized and to reduce the risk of cardiac decompensation. During the operation an unicuspid unicommissural aortic valve was revealed. The patient recovered well post-operatively. He was discharged 5 days after the surgery in good condition and was completely symptom-free at follow-up 6 weeks later. CONCLUSIONS: Unicuspid aortic valve is a rare congenital anomaly that can cause congenital aortic stenosis. It is seldom diagnosed pre-operatively but should be suspected in infants presenting with aortic stenosis.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Congenital ....pdf
Size:
5.530Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record