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dc.contributor.authorShulman, Rachel
dc.contributor.authorCohen, Debbie L
dc.contributor.authorGrandner, Michael A
dc.contributor.authorGislason, Thorarinn
dc.contributor.authorPack, Allan I
dc.contributor.authorKuna, Samuel T
dc.contributor.authorTownsend, Raymond R
dc.contributor.authorCohen, Jordana B
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-23T14:09:27Z
dc.date.available2019-01-23T14:09:27Z
dc.date.issued2018-12-01
dc.date.submitted2019-01
dc.identifier.citationSleep duration and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure in adults not on antihypertensive medications. 2018, 20(12):1712-1720 J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich).en_US
dc.identifier.issn1751-7176
dc.identifier.pmid30375723
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jch.13416
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/620797
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink belowen_US
dc.description.abstractShort sleep duration has been widely linked to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We performed a post hoc analysis of 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in the Lifestyle Modification in Blood Pressure Lowering Study (LIMBS) and Penn Icelandic Sleep Apnea (PISA) Study. The 24-hour mean systolic blood pressure (BP) was 12.7 mm Hg higher in LIMBS (P < 0.001; n = 66) and 4.7 mm Hg higher in PISA (P = 0.005; n = 153) among participants with shorter sleep duration (less than 7 hours) compared to those with longer sleep duration (at least 7 hours). In multivariable adjusted models, shorter sleep duration was strongly associated with higher systolic BP on 24-hour ABPM, independent of nocturnal BP and in-office BP. There was no effect modification by obstructive sleep apnea. Adults with shorter sleep duration may benefit from screening with 24-hour ABPM to promote earlier detection of hypertension and potentially mitigate their increased risk for future cardiovascular disease.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNIH (Bethesda, MD) NIHen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jch.13416en_US
dc.subjectambulatoryen_US
dc.subjectblood pressure monitoringen_US
dc.subjectcircadian rhythmen_US
dc.subjecthypertensionen_US
dc.subjectobstructive sleep apneaen_US
dc.subjectsleep deprivationen_US
dc.subjectsleep disordersen_US
dc.subjectSvefnen_US
dc.subjectSvefnleysien_US
dc.subjectHáþrýstinguren_US
dc.subject.meshSleep Deprivationen_US
dc.subject.meshBlood Pressureen_US
dc.titleSleep duration and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure in adults not on antihypertensive medications.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.department1 Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 2 Renal-Electrolyte and Hypertension Division, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 3 Sleep and Health Research Program, Department of Psychiatry, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona. 4 Department of Sleep Medicine, Landspitali - The National University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. 5 Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. 6 Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 7 Division of Sleep Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 8 Department of Medicine, Corporal Michael J. Crescenz Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 9 Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.en_US
dc.identifier.journalJournal of clinical hypertensionen_US
dc.rights.accessOpen Access - Opinn aðganguren_US
dc.departmentcodePAD12
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of clinical hypertension (Greenwich, Conn.)


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