Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorOwen, Jessica E
dc.contributor.authorBenediktsdÓttir, Bryndis
dc.contributor.authorGislason, Thorarinn
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Stephen R
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-04T14:41:46Z
dc.date.available2019-04-04T14:41:46Z
dc.date.issued2019-01-01
dc.date.submitted2019-04
dc.identifier.citationNeuropathological investigation of cell layer thickness and myelination in the hippocampus of people with obstructive sleep apnea. 2019, 42(1). doi: 10.1093/sleep/zsy199 Sleepen_US
dc.identifier.issn1550-9109
dc.identifier.pmid30346595
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/sleep/zsy199
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/620858
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink belowen_US
dc.description.abstractObstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is commonly associated with memory impairments. Although MRI studies have found volumetric differences in the hippocampus of people with OSA compared with controls, MRI lacks the spatial resolution to detect changes in the specific regions of the hippocampus that process different types of memory. The present study performed histopathological investigations on autopsy brain tissue from 32 people with OSA (17 females and 15 males) to examine whether the thickness and myelination of the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex (EC) vary as a function of OSA severity. Increasing OSA severity was found to be related to cortical thinning in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus (r2 = 0.136, p = 0.038), the CA1 (overall, r2 = 0.135, p = 0.039; layer 1, r2 = 0.157, p = 0.025; layer 2, r2 = 0.255, p = 0.003; and layer 3, r2 = 0.185, p = 0.014) and in some layers of the EC (layer 1, r2 = 0.186, p = 0.028; trend in layer 3, r2 = 0.124, p = 0.078). OSA severity was also related to decreased myelin in the deep layers but not the superficial layers of the EC (layer 6, r2 = 0.282, p = 0.006; deep white matter, r2 = 0.390, p = 0.001). Patients known to have used continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment showed no significant reductions in cortical thickness when compared with controls, suggesting that CPAP had a protective effect. However, CPAP did not protect against myelin loss. The regions of decreased cortical thickness and demyelination are locations of synaptic connections in both the polysynaptic (episodic and spatial) and direct (semantic) memory pathways and may underpin the impairments observed in episodic, semantic, and spatial memory in people with OSA.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipRMIT University Higher Degree by Research Publication Granten_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://academic.oup.com/sleep/article/42/1/zsy199/5139668en_US
dc.subjectKæfisvefnen_US
dc.subjectMinnien_US
dc.subjectHeilinnen_US
dc.subject.meshSleep Apnea, Obstructiveen_US
dc.subject.meshHippocampusen_US
dc.subject.meshMemory Disordersen_US
dc.titleNeuropathological investigation of cell layer thickness and myelination in the hippocampus of people with obstructive sleep apnea.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.department1 School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia. 2 Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. 3 Department of Sleep Medicine, Landspitali - The National University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.en_US
dc.identifier.journalSleepen_US
dc.rights.accessLandspitali Access - LSH-aðganguren_US
dc.departmentcodePAD12
dc.source.journaltitleSleep


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record