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dc.contributor.authorSvavarsdottir, Erla Kolbrun
dc.contributor.authorGisladottir, Margret
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-17T15:29:21Z
dc.date.available2019-05-17T15:29:21Z
dc.date.issued2019-03
dc.date.submitted2019-05
dc.identifier.citationHow Do Family Strengths-Oriented Therapeutic Conversations (FAM-SOTC) Advance Psychiatric Nursing Practice? 2019, 51(2):214-224 J Nurs Scholarshen_US
dc.identifier.issn1547-5069
dc.identifier.pmid30552746
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jnu.12450
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/620906
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink belowen_US
dc.description.abstractFamily nursing interventions, focusing on therapeutic conversations, have been found to benefit primary caregivers dealing with chronic and acute illnesses. Less is known, however, about the benefit of these interventions for partner caregivers. The aims of this study were to develop and test the Family Strengths-Oriented Therapeutic Conversation (FAM-SOTC) intervention for partner caregivers of young individuals with eating disorders (EDs). Eighteen partner caregivers of adolescents and young adults with ED participated in this quasi-experimental study. The FAM-SOTC intervention was offered over 4 months, during which time the focus was on establishing the therapeutic relationship and identification of the family relationships. The five key elements of the FAM-SOTC intervention are (a) drawing forward illness stories; (b) asking therapeutic questions; (c) identifying strength, resiliency, and resources; (d) offering evidence-based information and recommendations; and (e) strengthening helpful beliefs and challenging hindering beliefs. These elements provided the foundation for the study. Significantly higher family support and illness beliefs were reported after five sessions of the FAM-SOTC intervention and again after 3 follow-up booster sessions. The FAM-SOTC intervention demonstrated a positive benefit for participants. The FAM-SOTC intervention was found to benefit families, both in the short and long term, in psychiatry settings. After having participated in five sessions of the FAM-SOTC intervention and 3 booster sessions, partner caregivers of young individuals with ED experienced higher family support and reported better knowledge, more confidence, and more positive illness beliefs regarding the disorder.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipLandspitali-The National University Hospital Research Fund Science Fund of the Icelandic Nurses' Association Science Fund of Ingibjorg R. Magnusdottir and Birtan, a fund for children adolescents with mental health problems at BUGLen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://sigmapubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jnu.12450en_US
dc.subjectFamily strengths-oriented therapeutic conversationen_US
dc.subjectadvanced psychiatry nursing practiceen_US
dc.subject.meshFamily Nursingen_US
dc.subject.meshProfessional Practiceen_US
dc.titleHow Do Family Strengths-Oriented Therapeutic Conversations (FAM-SOTC) Advance Psychiatric Nursing Practice?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.department1 Professor and Academic Chair of Family Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, and Academic Chair of Family Nursing, Landspitali-The National University Hospital in Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland. 2 Psychiatric Clinical Nurse Specialist, Landspitali University Hospital, Landspitali-The National University Hospital in Iceland, Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Division, Reykjavik, Iceland.en_US
dc.identifier.journalJournal of nursing scholarshipen_US
dc.rights.accessOpen Access - Opinn aðganguren_US
dc.departmentcodeFSK12
dc.departmentcodePSN12
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of nursing scholarship : an official publication of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing


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