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dc.contributor.authorGunnarsdottir, M G
dc.contributor.authorJonsson, T
dc.contributor.authorHalldorsdottir, A M
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-26T13:58:26Z
dc.date.available2019-08-26T13:58:26Z
dc.date.issued2019-04
dc.date.submitted2019-08
dc.identifier.citationCirculating plasma microRNAs as biomarkers for iron status in blood donors. 2019, 29 Suppl 1:52-58. doi: 10.1111/tme.12554en_US
dc.identifier.issn1365-3148
dc.identifier.pmid30209836
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/tme.12554
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/621014
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink belowen_US
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To investigate whether microRNAs can serve as biomarkers for iron status in blood donors. BACKGROUND: Serum ferritin is a widely used biochemical test for detecting iron deficiency, but it has its limitations. Certain microRNAs (miRNAs) reportedly have a role in regulating iron homeostasis. Circulating miRNAs have been reported as potential biomarkers for various conditions but have not yet been studied in iron deficiency. METHODS: Participating blood donors were divided into two groups: high ferritin (HF) (>150 µg L-1 ) and low ferritin (LF) (<15 µg L-1 ). MiRNA analysis was performed by an miRNA profiling service (Exiqon) using commercial qPCR assays. The study had two phases: (i) a pilot study (20 participants) where 179 miRNAs were analysed and (ii) a confirmation study (50 participants) of 13 selected miRNAs. RESULTS: Mean serum ferritin was 13·8 µg L-1 in the LF arm compared to 231 µg L-1 in the HF group (P < 0·001). Hepcidin plasma levels were higher in the HF arm (P < 0·001), whereas soluble transferrin receptor 1 was higher in the LF group (P < 0·001). In the pilot study, samples did not separate according to study group on unsupervised analysis. When directly comparing HF vs LF groups, 17 miRNAs were differentially expressed (P < 0·05, t-test) but did not pass correction for multiple testing. The confirmation study of 13 selected miRNAs verified these findings as no miRNA was significantly different between the study groups. CONCLUSION: In this study, circulating plasma miRNAs did not emerge as promising biomarkers for iron status in healthy individuals. However, in the future, alternative detection methods such as next-generation sequencing might indicate miRNAs that correlate with iron stores.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipLandspitali University Hospital Research Funden_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/tme.12554en_US
dc.subjectbiomarkeren_US
dc.subjectblood donoren_US
dc.subjectferritinen_US
dc.subjectironen_US
dc.subjectmicroRNAen_US
dc.subjectBlóðgjöfen_US
dc.subjectJárn (næringarefni)en_US
dc.subject.meshmicroRNAen_US
dc.subject.meshFerritinsen_US
dc.subject.meshBlood Donorsen_US
dc.subject.meshBiomarkersen_US
dc.titleCirculating plasma microRNAs as biomarkers for iron status in blood donors.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.department1 Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. 2 Blood Bank, Landspitali National University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. 3 Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.en_US
dc.identifier.journalTransfusion medicineen_US
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren_US
dc.departmentcodeBAB12
dc.source.journaltitleTransfusion medicine (Oxford, England)


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