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dc.contributor.authorPutman, Rachel K
dc.contributor.authorGudmundsson, Gunnar
dc.contributor.authorAxelsson, Gisli Thor
dc.contributor.authorHida, Tomoyuki
dc.contributor.authorHonda, Osamu
dc.contributor.authorAraki, Tetsuro
dc.contributor.authorYanagawa, Masahiro
dc.contributor.authorNishino, Mizuki
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Ezra R
dc.contributor.authorEiriksdottir, Gudny
dc.contributor.authorGudmundsson, Elías F
dc.contributor.authorTomiyama, Noriyuki
dc.contributor.authorHonda, Hiroshi
dc.contributor.authorRosas, Ivan O
dc.contributor.authorWashko, George R
dc.contributor.authorCho, Michael H
dc.contributor.authorSchwartz, David A
dc.contributor.authorGudnason, Vilmundur
dc.contributor.authorHatabu, Hiroto
dc.contributor.authorHunninghake, Gary M
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-18T13:00:26Z
dc.date.available2019-09-18T13:00:26Z
dc.date.issued2019-07-15
dc.date.submitted2019-09
dc.identifier.citationImaging Patterns Are Associated with Interstitial Lung Abnormality Progression and Mortality. 2019, 200(2):175-183 Am J Respir Crit Care Meden_US
dc.identifier.issn1535-4970
dc.identifier.pmid30673508
dc.identifier.doi10.1164/rccm.201809-1652OC
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/621056
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink belowen_US
dc.description.abstractRationale: Interstitial lung abnormalities (ILA) are radiologic abnormalities on chest computed tomography scans that have been associated with an early or mild form of pulmonary fibrosis. Although ILA have been associated with radiologic progression, it is not known if specific imaging patterns are associated with progression or risk of mortality. Objectives: To determine the role of imaging patterns on the risk of death and ILA progression. Methods: ILA (and imaging pattern) were assessed in 5,320 participants from the AGES-Reykjavik Study, and ILA progression was assessed in 3,167 participants. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess factors associated with ILA progression, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess time to mortality. Measurements and Main Results: Over 5 years, 327 (10%) had ILA on at least one computed tomography, and 1,435 (45%) did not have ILA on either computed tomography. Of those with ILA, 238 (73%) had imaging progression, whereas 89 (27%) had stable to improved imaging; increasing age and copies of MUC5B genotype were associated with imaging progression. The definite fibrosis pattern was associated with the highest risk of progression (odds ratio, 8.4; 95% confidence interval, 2.7-25; P = 0.0003). Specific imaging patterns were also associated with an increased risk of death. After adjustment, both a probable usual interstitial pneumonia and usual interstitial pneumonia pattern were associated with an increased risk of death when compared with those indeterminate for usual interstitial pneumonia (hazard ratio, 1.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.4; P = 0.001; hazard ratio, 3.9; 95% confidence interval, 2.3-6.8;P < 0.0001), respectively. Conclusions: In those with ILA, imaging patterns can be used to help predict who is at the greatest risk of progression and early death.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Thoracic Societyen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.atsjournals.org/doi/10.1164/rccm.201809-1652OCen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6635786/en_US
dc.subjectidiopathic pulmonary fibrosisen_US
dc.subjectimaging patternen_US
dc.subjectinterstitial lung abnormalitiesen_US
dc.subjectmortalityen_US
dc.subjectprogressionen_US
dc.subjectLungnasjúkdómaren_US
dc.subjectMyndgreining (læknisfræði)en_US
dc.subjectLífslíkuren_US
dc.subject.meshIdiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosisen_US
dc.subject.meshPulmonary Fibrosisen_US
dc.subject.meshDiagnostic Imagingen_US
dc.titleImaging Patterns Are Associated with Interstitial Lung Abnormality Progression and Mortality.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.department1 Pulmonary and Critical Care Division. 2 Department of Respiratory Medicine and Sleep, Faculty of Medicine, Landspital University Hospital and. 3 Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. 4 Icelandic Heart Association, Kopavogur, Iceland. 5 Department of Radiology. 6 Center for Pulmonary Functional Imaging, and. 7 Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan. 8 Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan; and. 9 Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. 10 Department of Medicine, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado.en_US
dc.identifier.journalAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicineen_US
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren_US
dc.departmentcodePAD12
dc.source.journaltitleAmerican journal of respiratory and critical care medicine


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