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dc.contributor.authorHrolfsdottir, Laufey
dc.contributor.authorGunnarsdottir, Ingibjorg
dc.contributor.authorBirgisdottir, Bryndis Eva
dc.contributor.authorHreidarsdottir, Ingibjorg Th
dc.contributor.authorSmarason, Alexander Kr
dc.contributor.authorHardardottir, Hildur
dc.contributor.authorHalldorsson, Thorhallur I
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-01T13:38:43Z
dc.date.available2019-10-01T13:38:43Z
dc.date.issued2019-08-11
dc.date.submitted2019-10
dc.identifier.citationCan a Simple Dietary Screening in Early Pregnancy Identify Dietary Habits Associated with Gestational Diabetes? 2019, 11(8). pii: E1868. doi: 10.3390/nu11081868 Nutrientsen_US
dc.identifier.issn2072-6643
dc.identifier.pmid31405206
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/nu11081868
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/621089
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article, please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field or click on the hyperlink at the top of the page marked Downloaden_US
dc.description.abstractGestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is predominantly a lifestyle disease, with diet being an important modifiable risk factor. A major obstacle for the prevention in clinical practice is the complexity of assessing diet. In a cohort of 1651 Icelandic women, this study examined whether a short 40-item dietary screening questionnaire administered in the 1st trimester could identify dietary habits associated with GDM. The dietary variables were aggregated into predefined binary factors reflecting inadequate or optimal intake and stepwise backward elimination was used to identify a reduced set of factors that best predicted GDM. Those binary factors were then aggregated into a risk score (range: 0-7), that was mostly characterised by frequent consumption of soft drinks, sweets, cookies, ice creams and processed meat. The women with poor dietary habits (score ≥ 5, n = 302), had a higher risk of GDM (RR = 1.38; 95%CI = 3, 85) compared with women with a more optimal diet (score ≤ 2, n = 407). In parallel, a pilot (n = 100) intervention was conducted among overweight and obese women examining the effect of internet-based personalized feedback on diet quality. Simple feedback was given in accordance with the answers provided in the screening questionnaire in 1st trimester. At the endpoint, the improvements in diet quality were observed by, as an example, soft drink consumption being reduced by ~1 L/week on average in the intervention group compared to the controls. Our results suggest that a simple dietary screening tool administered in the 1st trimester could identify dietary habits associated with GMD. This tool should be easy to use in a clinical setting, and with simple individualized feedback, improvements in diet may be achieved.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Iceland Technology Development Fund Icelandic Centre for Research (RANNIS)en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMDPI Publishingen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/11/8/1868en_US
dc.subjectdietary habitsen_US
dc.subjectdietary screeningen_US
dc.subjectfood frequency questionnaireen_US
dc.subjectgestational diabetesen_US
dc.subjectmaternal nutritionen_US
dc.subjectSykursýkien_US
dc.subjectMeðgangaen_US
dc.subjectSpurningalistaren_US
dc.subject.meshDiabetes, Gestationalen_US
dc.subject.meshFeeding Behavioren_US
dc.subject.meshSurveys and Questionnairesen_US
dc.titleCan a Simple Dietary Screening in Early Pregnancy Identify Dietary Habits Associated with Gestational Diabetes?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.department1 Unit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali University Hospital and Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Iceland, Eiríksgata 29 101 Reykjavik, Iceland. laufeyh@sak.is. 2 Institution of Health Science Research, University of Akureyri and Akureyri Hospital, Eyrarlandsvegi, 600 Akureyri, Iceland. laufeyh@sak.is. 3 Unit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali University Hospital and Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Iceland, Eiríksgata 29 101 Reykjavik, Iceland. 4 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Landspitali University Hospital, Hringbraut, 101 Reykjavík, Iceland. 5 Institution of Health Science Research, University of Akureyri and Akureyri Hospital, Eyrarlandsvegi, 600 Akureyri, Iceland. 6 Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Vatnsmýrarvegi 16, 101 Reykjavík, Iceland. 7 Centre for Fetal Programming, Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Artillerivej 5, 2300 Copenhagen, Denmark.en_US
dc.identifier.journalNutrientsen_US
dc.rights.accessOpen Access - Opinn aðganguren_US
dc.departmentcodeNUR12
dc.departmentcodeMIW12
dc.departmentcodeOAG12
dc.source.journaltitleNutrients
refterms.dateFOA2019-10-01T13:38:44Z


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