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dc.contributor.authorKristinsdottir, Iris
dc.contributor.authorHaraldsson, Asgeir
dc.contributor.authorThorkelsson, Thordur
dc.contributor.authorHaraldsson, Gunnsteinn
dc.contributor.authorKristinsson, Karl G
dc.contributor.authorLarsen, Jesper
dc.contributor.authorLarsen, Anders Rhod
dc.contributor.authorThors, Valtyr
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-03T14:00:25Z
dc.date.available2019-10-03T14:00:25Z
dc.date.issued2019-09-11
dc.date.submitted2019-10
dc.identifier.citationMRSA outbreak in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit in Iceland. 2019, 1-9. doi: 10.1080/23744235.2019.1662083 Infect Dis (Lond)en_US
dc.identifier.issn2374-4243
dc.identifier.pmid31507231
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/23744235.2019.1662083
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/621096
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink belowen_US
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Preventing the spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and understanding the pathophysiology and transmission is essential. This study describes an MRSA outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit in Reykjavik, Iceland at a time where no screening procedures were active. Materials and methods: After isolating MRSA in the neonatal intensive care unit in 2015, neonates, staff members and parents of positive patients were screened and environmental samples collected. The study period was from 14 April 2015 until 31 August 2015. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing, spa-typing and whole genome sequencing were done on MRSA isolates. Results: During the study period, 96/143 admitted patients were screened for colonization. Non-screened infants had short admissions not including screening days. MRSA was isolated from nine infants and seven parents. All tested staff members were negative. Eight infants and six parents carried MRSA ST30-IVc with spa-type t253 and one infant and its parent carried MRSA CC9-IVa (spa-type t4845) while most environmental samples were MRSA CC9-IVa (spa-type t4845). Whole genome sequencing revealed close relatedness between all ST30-IVc and CC9-IVa isolates, respectively. All colonized infants received decolonization treatment, but 3/9 were still positive when last sampled. Discussion: The main outbreak source was a single MRSA ST30-IVc (spa-type t253), isolated for the first time in Iceland. A new CC9-IVa (spa-type t4845) was also identified, most abundant on environmental surfaces but only in one patient. The reason for the differences in the epidemiology of the two strains is not clear. The study highlights a need for screening procedures in high-risk settings and guidelines for neonatal decolonization.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/23744235.2019.1662083en_US
dc.subjectMLSTen_US
dc.subjectMRSAen_US
dc.subjectNICUen_US
dc.subjectdecolonizationen_US
dc.subjectneonatesen_US
dc.subjectwhole genome sequencingen_US
dc.subjectNýburaren_US
dc.subjectBakteríusjúkdómaren_US
dc.subjectSpítalasýkingaren_US
dc.subject.meshIntensive Care Units, Neonatalen_US
dc.subject.meshMethicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureusen_US
dc.titleMRSA outbreak in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit in Iceland.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.department1 Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland , Reykjavík , Iceland. 2 Children's Hospital Iceland, Landspitali University Hospital , Reykjavík , Iceland. 3 Department of Clinical Microbiology, Landspitali University Hospital , Reykjavík , Iceland. 4 Department of Bacteria, Parasites and Fungi, Statens Serum Institute , Copenhagen , Denmark.en_US
dc.identifier.journalInfectious Diseasesen_US
dc.rights.accessLandspitali Access - LSH-aðganguren_US
dc.departmentcodePED12
dc.departmentcodeNAF12
dc.departmentcodeBAC12
dc.source.journaltitleInfectious diseases (London, England)


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