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dc.contributor.authorJónsdóttir, Rakel B
dc.contributor.authorJónsdóttir, Helga
dc.contributor.authorSkúladóttir, Arna
dc.contributor.authorThorkelsson, Thordur
dc.contributor.authorFlacking, Renée
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-24T14:13:42Z
dc.date.available2019-10-24T14:13:42Z
dc.date.issued2019-10-08
dc.date.submitted2019-10
dc.identifier.citationBreastfeeding progression in late preterm infants from birth to one month. 2019, e12893. doi: 10.1111/mcn.12893 Matern Child Nutren_US
dc.identifier.issn1740-8709
dc.identifier.pmid31595692
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/mcn.12893
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/621116
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article, please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field or click on the hyperlink at the top of the page marked Downloaden_US
dc.description.abstractThis study aimed to describe and compare breastfeeding progression, infants' feeding behaviours, maternal feeding difficulties, and mothers' usage of breastfeeding interventions for singleton late preterm (LPT) and term infants. A further aim was to identify associated factors for exclusive breastfeeding at breast at 1 month in LPT infants. This was a cohort study where mothers of LPT infants from a neonatal unit (n = 60), LPT infants from a maternity unit (n = 62), and term infants from a maternity unit (n = 269) answered a questionnaire approximately 1 month after delivery. Findings showed no significant differences in exclusive breastfeeding at breasts between LPT infants admitted to the neonatal unit compared with the maternity unit, during the first week at home (38% vs. 48%), or at 1 month of age (52% vs. 50%). Term infants were more likely to be exclusively breastfed at the breast (86% and 74%, p < 0.05) compared with LPT infants. Multiple regression analysis showed that usage of a nipple shield, not feeding breast milk exclusively during the first week at home, or feeding less than 10 times per day at 1 month were statistically significant for not exclusively breastfeed at the breast. A protective factor was the mothers' experience of having an abundance of milk during the first week at home. In conclusion, LPT infants are less likely to be exclusively breastfed at the breast than term infants, highlighting the need for further research to guide interventions aimed at optimising exclusive breastfeeding rates.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipLandspitali University Hospital Science Fund Icelandic Nurses Association Science Funden_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/mcn.12893en_US
dc.subjectbreastfeeding patternen_US
dc.subjectexclusive breastfeedingen_US
dc.subjectlate preterm infantsen_US
dc.subjectmaternity uniten_US
dc.subjectneonatal intensive care uniten_US
dc.subjectnipple shieldsen_US
dc.subjectFyrirburaren_US
dc.subjectBrjóstagjöfen_US
dc.subject.meshInfant, Prematureen_US
dc.subject.meshBreast Feedingen_US
dc.titleBreastfeeding progression in late preterm infants from birth to one month.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.department1 Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Landspitali-The National University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland. 2 Faculty of Nursing, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland. 3 Faculty of Medicine, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland. 4 School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.en_US
dc.identifier.journalMaternal and Child Nutritionen_US
dc.rights.accessOpen Access - Opinn aðganguren_US
dc.departmentcodePAN12
dc.departmentcodePED12
dc.source.journaltitleMaternal & child nutrition
refterms.dateFOA2019-10-24T14:13:43Z


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