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dc.contributor.authorGrétarsdóttir, Áslaug Salka
dc.contributor.authorAspelund, Thor
dc.contributor.authorSteingrímsdóttir, Þóra
dc.contributor.authorBjarnadóttir, Ragnheiður Ingibjörg
dc.contributor.authorEinarsdóttir, Kristjana
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-09T10:59:40Z
dc.date.available2019-12-09T10:59:40Z
dc.date.issued2019-11-19
dc.date.submitted2019-12
dc.identifier.citationGrétarsdóttir ÁS, Aspelund T, Steingrímsdóttir Þ, Bjarnadóttir RI, Einarsdóttir K. Preterm births in Iceland 1997‐2016: Preterm birth rates by gestational age groups and type of preterm birth. Birth. 2019;00:1–10. https ://doi.org/10.1111/birt.12467en_US
dc.identifier.issn1523-536X
dc.identifier.pmid31746027
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/birt.12467
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/621206
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink belowen_US
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The frequency of preterm births has been increasing globally, mainly due to a rise in iatrogenic late preterm births. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of preterm births in Iceland during 1997-2016 by type of preterm birth. METHODS: This study included all live births in Iceland during 1997-2016 identified from the Icelandic Medical Birth Registry. Risk of preterm birth by time period was assessed with Poisson regression models adjusted for demographic variables and indications for iatrogenic births. RESULTS: The study population included 87 076 infants, of which 4986 (5.7%) were preterm. The preterm birth rate increased from 5.3% to 6.1% (adjusted rate ratio [ARR] = 1.16, confidence interval [CI] = 1.07-1.26) between 1997-2001 and 2012-2016 overall. The increase was only evident in multiples (ARR 1.41, 95% CI 1.21-1.65), not singletons (1.07, 0.97-1.19). The rate of late preterm births (34-36 weeks) increased significantly (1.24, 1.14-1.40), and the rate of iatrogenic preterm births more than doubled during this period even after adjustment for identified medical indications (2.40, 2.00-2.88). The rate of spontaneous preterm births decreased during the study period (0.63, 0.55-0.73), and the rate of PPROM increased (1.31, 1.09-1.57). The most common contributing indications for iatrogenic births were fetal distress (26.2%), hypertensive disorders (18.2%), and severe preeclampsia (16.9%). CONCLUSIONS: Preterm birth rates increased in multiples in Iceland between 1997 and 2016, and late and iatrogenic preterm births increased overall. The increase in iatrogenic preterm births remained significant after adjusting for medical indications, suggesting that other factors might be affecting the rise.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Iceland Research Funden_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/birt.12467en_US
dc.subjectindicationen_US
dc.subjectpreterm birthen_US
dc.subjectprevalenceen_US
dc.subjectFyrirburaren_US
dc.subject.meshObstetric Labor, Prematureen_US
dc.subject.meshIcelanden_US
dc.titlePreterm births in Iceland 1997-2016: Preterm birth rates by gestational age groups and type of preterm birth.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.department1 Centre of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. 2 Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland. 3 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Landspítali University Hospital, Reykjavík, Iceland.en_US
dc.identifier.journalBirthen_US
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren_US
dc.departmentcodeOAG12
dc.source.journaltitleBirth (Berkeley, Calif.)


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