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dc.contributor.authorCarraro, Ugo
dc.contributor.authorKern, Helmut
dc.contributor.authorGava, Paolo
dc.contributor.authorHofer, Christian
dc.contributor.authorLoefler, Stefan
dc.contributor.authorGargiulo, Paolo
dc.contributor.authorEdmunds, Kyle
dc.contributor.authorÁrnadóttir, Íris Dröfn
dc.contributor.authorZampieri, Sandra
dc.contributor.authorRavara, Barbara
dc.contributor.authorGava, Francesco
dc.contributor.authorNori, Alessandra
dc.contributor.authorGobbo, Valerio
dc.contributor.authorMasiero, Stefano
dc.contributor.authorMarcante, Andrea
dc.contributor.authorBaba, Alfonc
dc.contributor.authorPiccione, Francesco
dc.contributor.authorSchils, Sheila
dc.contributor.authorPond, Amber
dc.contributor.authorMosole, Simone
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-11T15:45:40Z
dc.date.available2019-12-11T15:45:40Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-03
dc.date.submitted2019-12
dc.identifier.citationCarraro, U., Kern, H., Gava, P. et al. Recovery from muscle weakness by exercise and FES: lessons from Masters, active or sedentary seniors and SCI patients. Aging Clin Exp Res 29, 579–590 (2017) doi:10.1007/s40520-016-0619-1en_US
dc.identifier.pmid27592133
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s40520-016-0619-1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/621221
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink belowen_US
dc.description.abstractMany factors contribute to the decline of skeletal muscle that occurs as we age. This is a reality that we may combat, but not prevent because it is written into our genome. The series of records from World Master Athletes reveals that skeletal muscle power begins to decline at the age of 30 years and continues, almost linearly, to zero at the age of 110 years. Here we discuss evidence that denervation contributes to the atrophy and slowness of aged muscle. We compared muscle from lifelong active seniors to that of sedentary elderly people and found that the sportsmen have more muscle bulk and slow fiber type groupings, providing evidence that physical activity maintains slow motoneurons which reinnervate muscle fibers. Further, accelerated muscle atrophy/degeneration occurs with irreversible Conus and Cauda Equina syndrome, a spinal cord injury in which the human leg muscles may be permanently disconnected from the nervous system with complete loss of muscle fibers within 5-8 years. We used histological morphometry and Muscle Color Computed Tomography to evaluate muscle from these peculiar persons and reveal that contraction produced by home-based Functional Electrical Stimulation (h-bFES) recovers muscle size and function which is reversed if h-bFES is discontinued. FES also reverses muscle atrophy in sedentary seniors and modulates mitochondria in horse muscles. All together these observations indicate that FES modifies muscle fibers by increasing contractions per day. Thus, FES should be considered in critical care units, rehabilitation centers and nursing facilities when patients are unable or reluctant to exercise.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipEuropean Regional Development Fund-Cross Border Cooperation Programme Slovakia-Austria (Interreg-IVa), project Mobilitat im Alter, MOBIL Ludwig Boltzmann Institute of Electrical Stimulation and Physical Rehabilitation, Austria Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University of Vienna, Austria Faculty of Physical Education and Sports, Comenius University in Bratislava, Slovakia Austrian national cofinancing of the Austrian Federal Ministry of Science and Research Ludwig Boltzmann Society (Vienna, Austria) EU Commission Shared Cost Project RISE - Austrian Ministry of Science United States Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health (NIH) - USA NIH National Institute of Arthritis & Musculoskeletal & Skin Diseases (NIAMS)en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs40520-016-0619-1#citeasen_US
dc.subjectAgingen_US
dc.subjectDenervation and type groupingen_US
dc.subjectFES recoveryen_US
dc.subjectMaster Athletesen_US
dc.subjectMuscleen_US
dc.subjectMuscle Color Computed Tomographyen_US
dc.subjectAldraðiren_US
dc.subjectVöðvaren_US
dc.subjectLíkamsrækten_US
dc.subjectÖldrunen_US
dc.subject.meshMuscle Weaknessen_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAgingen_US
dc.subject.meshExerciseen_US
dc.titleRecovery from muscle weakness by exercise and FES: lessons from Masters, active or sedentary seniors and SCI patients.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.typeOtheren_US
dc.identifier.eissn1720-8319
dc.contributor.department1 IRCCS Fondazione Ospedale San Camillo, Venice, Italy. 2 Ludwig Boltzmann Institute of Electrical Stimulation and Physical Rehabilitation, Vienna, Austria. 3 Institute of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Wilhelminenspital, Vienna, Austria. 4 Laboratory of Translational Myology of the Interdepartmental Research Center of Myology, Department of Biomedical Science, University of Padova, Via Ugo Bassi 58/B, 35131, Padua, Italy. 5 Institute for Biomedical and Neural Engineering, Reykjavík, Iceland. 6 Landspítali, Reykjavík, Iceland. 7 Department of Biomedical Science, C.N.R. Institute of Neuroscience, University of Padova, Padua, Italy. 8 Rehabilitation Unit, Department of Neuroscience, University of Padova, Padua, Italy. 9 EquiNew, River Falls, WI, USA. 10 Anatomy Department, Southern Illinois University, School of Medicine, Carbondale, IL, USA. 11 Ludwig Boltzmann Institute of Electrical Stimulation and Physical Rehabilitation, Vienna, Austria. bioteck88@gmail.com. 12 Laboratory of Translational Myology of the Interdepartmental Research Center of Myology, Department of Biomedical Science, University of Padova, Via Ugo Bassi 58/B, 35131, Padua, Italy. bioteck88@gmail.com.en_US
dc.identifier.journalAging Clinical and Experimental Researchen_US
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren_US
dc.source.journaltitleAging clinical and experimental research
dc.source.volume29
dc.source.issue4
dc.source.beginpage579
dc.source.endpage590
dc.source.countryGermany


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