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dc.contributor.authorIngadottir, Brynja
dc.contributor.authorBlondal, Katrin
dc.contributor.authorJaarsma, Tiny
dc.contributor.authorThylen, Ingela
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-12T14:14:03Z
dc.date.available2019-12-12T14:14:03Z
dc.date.issued2016-11
dc.date.submitted2019-12
dc.identifier.citationIngadottir B, Blondal K, Jaarsma T, Thylen I. Perceptions about traditional and novel methods to learn about postoperative pain management: a qualitative study. Journal of advanced nursing. 2016 Nov;72(11):2672-83.en_US
dc.identifier.pmid27205900
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jan.13021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/621225
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink belowen_US
dc.description.abstractAIM: The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of surgical patients about traditional and novel methods to learn about postoperative pain management. BACKGROUND: Patient education is an important part of postoperative care. Contemporary technology offers new ways for patients to learn about self-care, although face-to-face discussions and brochures are the most common methods of delivering education in nursing practice. DESIGN: A qualitative design with a vignette and semi-structured interviews used for data collection. METHODS: A purposeful sample of 13 postsurgical patients, who had been discharged from hospital, was recruited during 2013-2014. The patients were given a vignette about anticipated hospital discharge after surgery with four different options for communication (face-to-face, brochure, website, serious game) to learn about postoperative pain management. They were asked to rank their preferred method of learning and thereafter to reflect on their choices. Data were analysed using an inductive content analysis approach. FINDINGS: Patients preferred face-to-face education with a nurse, followed by brochures and websites, while games were least preferred. Two categories, each with two sub-categories, emerged from the data. These conceptualized the factors affecting patients' perceptions: (1) 'Trusting the source', sub-categorized into 'Being familiar with the method' and 'Having own prejudgments'; and (2) 'Being motivated to learn' sub-categorized into 'Managing an impaired cognition' and 'Aspiring for increased knowledge'. CONCLUSION: To implement successfully novel educational methods into postoperative care, healthcare professionals need to be aware of the factors influencing patients' perceptions about how to learn, such as trust and motivation.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipLandspitali University Hospital Research Fund Icelandic Nurses' Association Research Funden_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jan.13021en_US
dc.rights© 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
dc.subjectcontent analysisen_US
dc.subjecteducational methodsen_US
dc.subjectnursingen_US
dc.subjectpatient educationen_US
dc.subjectpatient learningen_US
dc.subjectpostoperative self-careen_US
dc.subjectvignettesen_US
dc.subjectSjúklingafræðslaen_US
dc.subjectSkurðsjúklingaren_US
dc.subjectVerkiren_US
dc.subject.meshPain, Postoperativeen_US
dc.subject.meshSelf Careen_US
dc.subject.meshPatient Education as Topicen_US
dc.titlePerceptions about traditional and novel methods to learn about postoperative pain management: a qualitative study.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1365-2648
dc.contributor.department1 Divison of Nursing, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden. brynjain@landspitali.is. 2 Landspitali - The National University Hospital of Iceland, Surgical Services and Faculty of Nursing, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. brynjain@landspitali.is. 3 Landspitali - The National University Hospital of Iceland, Surgical Services and Faculty of Nursing, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. 4 Divison of Nursing, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden. 5 Department of Cardiology and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.en_US
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Advanced Nursingen_US
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren_US
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of advanced nursing
dc.source.volume72
dc.source.issue11
dc.source.beginpage2672
dc.source.endpage2683
dc.source.countryEngland


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