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dc.contributor.authorEgilson, Snæfrídur T
dc.contributor.authorÓlafsdóttir, Linda B
dc.contributor.authorLeósdóttir, Thóra
dc.contributor.authorSaemundsen, Evald
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-13T10:35:00Z
dc.date.available2019-12-13T10:35:00Z
dc.date.issued2016-02
dc.date.submitted2019-13
dc.identifier.citationEgilson ST, Ólafsdóttir LB, Leósdóttir T, Saemundsen E. Quality of life of high-functioning children and youth with autism spectrum disorder and typically developing peers: Self-and proxy-reports. Autism. 2017 Feb;21(2):133-41.en_US
dc.identifier.pmid27048354
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1362361316630881
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/621228
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink belowen_US
dc.description.abstractStudies have shown parents to report lower quality of life for their children with autism spectrum disorder than children's self-report scores and the same applies for data on typically developing children. Our objectives were to: (1) explore how high-functioning children with autism spectrum disorder rate their quality of life compared with paired controls without autism spectrum disorder; (2) explore how parents of high-functioning children with autism spectrum disorder rate their children's quality of life compared with parents of paired controls; and (3) compare child self-reports of quality of life with their parent's proxy-reports for both groups of children. Data were collected with the Icelandic self- and proxy-reported versions of the KIDSCREEN-27. Reports of 96 children with autism spectrum disorder, 211 controls and their parents were included in the analyses. Compared with controls, children with autism spectrum disorder had lower means on all quality of life dimensions. Parents of children with autism spectrum disorder evaluated their children's quality of life lower on all dimensions than did parents of controls. On four out of five dimensions, children with autism spectrum disorder reported better quality of life than did their parents. Despite differences in ratings children with autism spectrum disorder and their parents agreed on the most problematic dimensions, namely, social support and peers and physical well-being. Our results highlight the importance of seeking the viewpoints of both children and their parents.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Akureyri University of Iceland Research Fundsen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSAGE Publicationsen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1362361316630881en_US
dc.subjectKIDSCREEN-27en_US
dc.subjectautismen_US
dc.subjectchild self-reportsen_US
dc.subjectparent’s proxy-reportsen_US
dc.subjectquality of lifeen_US
dc.subjectEinhverfaen_US
dc.subjectLífsgæðien_US
dc.subject.meshAutistic Disorderen_US
dc.subject.meshQuality of Lifeen_US
dc.titleQuality of life of high-functioning children and youth with autism spectrum disorder and typically developing peers: Self- and proxy-reports.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1461-7005
dc.contributor.department1 1 University of Iceland, Iceland. 2 2 The State Diagnostic and Counselling Centre, Iceland.en_US
dc.identifier.journalAutism : the international journal of research and practiceen_US
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren_US
dc.source.journaltitleAutism : the international journal of research and practice
dc.source.volume21
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpage133
dc.source.endpage141
dc.source.countryEngland


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