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dc.contributor.authorDrake, Kim E.
dc.contributor.authorSigfusdottir, Inga Dora
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, Jon Fridrik
dc.contributor.authorGudjonsson, Gisli H.
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-17T13:02:30Z
dc.date.available2019-12-17T13:02:30Z
dc.date.issued2016-01-01
dc.date.submitted2019-12
dc.identifier.citationDrake KE, Sigfusdottir ID, Sigurdsson JF, Gudjonsson GH. Investigating the interplay between the reported witnessing and experiencing of physical violence within the home, the death of a parent or sibling, stress-sensitivity, and reported false confessions in males. Pers Individ Dif. 2016;88:114-9.en_US
dc.identifier.issn01918869
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.paid.2015.08.047
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/621239
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink belowen_US
dc.description.abstractThis study investigates the interplay between the reported witnessing and experiencing of physical violence within the home, the death of a parent or sibling, latent stress-sensitivity levels, and reported false confessions in males. Data were obtained from 5394 male students in further education in Iceland. Zero-inflated negative binomial models were fitted, showing that reported levels of physical violence within the home and the death of a parent or sibling significantly increased the likelihood of reported false confessions. Latent stress-sensitivity interacted with both reported levels of physical violence and the reported experience of the death of a parent or sibling, strengthening the effect of such adverse experiences on the likelihood no false confessions reported. Trait stress-sensitivity therefore appears to increase susceptibility to external influences, and may be a critical factor in predicting the likelihood of false confessions, for a variety of reasons, in young males. Stress-sensitive male interviewees may find it harder to adapt and adjust following adversity, and harder to deal with their emotions during police questioning, rendering such detainees more vulnerable and at risk. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0191886915005632?via%3Dihuben_US
dc.subjectFalse confessionsen_US
dc.subjectParental or sibling deathen_US
dc.subjectPhysical violenceen_US
dc.subjectStress sensitivityen_US
dc.subjectZero inflated negative binomial regressionen_US
dc.subjectHeimilisofbeldien_US
dc.subjectJátningar afbrotaen_US
dc.subject.meshDomestic Violenceen_US
dc.subject.meshPersuasive Communicationen_US
dc.titleInvestigating the interplay between the reported witnessing and experiencing of physical violence within the home, the death of a parent or sibling, stress-sensitivity, and reported false confessions in malesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentaUniversity of West London, Paragon House, Brentford, TW8 9GA, United Kingdom bReykjavik University, Menntavegi 1, Reykjavik, 101, Iceland cTeacher's College, Colombia University, 525 west, 120th street, Manhattan, NY 10027, United States dUniversity of Iceland, Landspitali - The National University Hospital of Iceland, Hringbraut, Reykjavik, 101, Iceland eKing's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Denmark Hill, London, SE5 8AF, United Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.journalPersonality and Individual Differencesen_US
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren_US
dc.identifier.eid2-s2.0-84941768266
dc.identifier.scopusidSCOPUS_ID:84941768266
dc.identifier.piiS0191886915005632
dc.source.journaltitlePersonality and Individual Differences
dc.source.volume88
dc.source.beginpage114
dc.source.endpage119


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