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dc.contributor.authorMusaeus, Christian S
dc.contributor.authorEngedal, Knut
dc.contributor.authorHøgh, Peter
dc.contributor.authorJelic, Vesna
dc.contributor.authorKhanna, Arjun R
dc.contributor.authorKjaer, Troels Wesenberg
dc.contributor.authorMørup, Morten
dc.contributor.authorNaik, Mala
dc.contributor.authorOeksengaard, Anne-Rita
dc.contributor.authorSantarnecchi, Emiliano
dc.contributor.authorSnaedal, Jon
dc.contributor.authorWahlund, Lars-Olof
dc.contributor.authorWaldemar, Gunhild
dc.contributor.authorAndersen, Birgitte B
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-27T13:04:42Z
dc.date.available2020-05-27T13:04:42Z
dc.date.issued2020-04-27
dc.date.submitted2020-05
dc.identifier.citationMusaeus CS, Engedal K, Høgh P, et al. Changes in the left temporal microstate are a sign of cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer's disease [published online ahead of print, 2020 Apr 27]. Brain Behav. 2020;e01630. doi:10.1002/brb3.1630en_US
dc.identifier.pmid32338460
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/brb3.1630
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/621420
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article, please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field or click on the hyperlink at the top of the page marked Downloaden_US
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Large-scale brain networks are disrupted in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Electroencephalography microstate analysis, a promising method for studying brain networks, parses EEG signals into topographies representing discrete, sequential network activations. Prior studies indicate that patients with AD show a pattern of global microstate disorganization. We investigated whether any specific microstate changes could be found in patients with AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) compared to healthy controls (HC). Materials and methods: Standard EEGs were obtained from 135 HC, 117 patients with MCI, and 117 patients with AD from six Nordic memory clinics. We parsed the data into four archetypal microstates. Results: There was significantly increased duration, occurrence, and coverage of microstate A in patients with AD and MCI compared to HC. When looking at microstates in specific frequency bands, we found that microstate A was affected in delta (1-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), and beta (13-30 Hz), while microstate D was affected only in the delta and theta bands. Microstate features were able to separate HC from AD with an accuracy of 69.8% and HC from MCI with an accuracy of 58.7%. Conclusions: Further studies are needed to evaluate whether microstates represent a valuable disease classifier. Overall, patients with AD and MCI, as compared to HC, show specific microstate alterations, which are limited to specific frequency bands. These alterations suggest disruption of large-scale cortical networks in AD and MCI, which may be limited to specific frequency bands.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKavli Charitable Trusten_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/brb3.1630en_US
dc.rights© 2020 The Authors. Brain and Behavior published by Wiley Periodicals, LLC.
dc.subjectAlzheimer's diseaseen_US
dc.subjectEEGen_US
dc.subjectmicrostateen_US
dc.subjectmild cognitive impairmenten_US
dc.subjectnetworken_US
dc.subjectHeilabilunen_US
dc.subjectAlzheimer sjúkdómuren_US
dc.subject.meshAlzheimer Diseaseen_US
dc.subject.meshDementiaen_US
dc.titleChanges in the left temporal microstate are a sign of cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer's disease.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn2162-3279
dc.contributor.department1Department of Neurology, Danish Dementia Research Centre (DDRC), Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. 2Norwegian National Advisory Unit on Ageing and Health (Ageing and Health), Vestfold Hospital Trust and Oslo University Hospital, Ullevaal, Oslo, Norway. 3Regional Dementia Research Center, Department of Neurology, Zealand University Hospital, Roskilde, Denmark. 4Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. 5Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. 6Department of Geriatric Medicine, Memory Clinic, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden. 7Department of Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. 8Neurophysiology Center, Zealand University Hospital, Roskilde, Denmark. 9Section for Cognitive Systems, DTU Compute, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark. 10Department of Geriatric Medicine, Haraldsplass Deaconess Hospital, Bergen, Norway. 11Berenson-Allen Center for Non-invasive Brain Stimulation, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. 12Department of Geriatric Medicine, Landspítali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.en_US
dc.identifier.journalBrain and behavioren_US
dc.rights.accessOpen Access - Opinn aðganguren_US
dc.departmentcodeGER12
dc.source.journaltitleBrain and behavior
dc.source.beginpagee01630
dc.source.endpage
refterms.dateFOA2020-05-27T13:04:42Z
dc.source.countryUnited States


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