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dc.contributor.authorBock, David
dc.contributor.authorAngenete, Eva
dc.contributor.authorAsplund, Dan
dc.contributor.authorBjartell, Anders
dc.contributor.authorCarlsson, Stefan
dc.contributor.authorHugosson, Jonas
dc.contributor.authorStinesen Kollberg, Karin
dc.contributor.authorLantz, Anna
dc.contributor.authorNilsson, Hanna
dc.contributor.authorPrytz, Mattias
dc.contributor.authorSteineck, Gunnar
dc.contributor.authorThorsteinsdottir, Thordis
dc.contributor.authorWiklund, Peter
dc.contributor.authorHaglind, Eva
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-22T10:44:53Z
dc.date.available2020-06-22T10:44:53Z
dc.date.issued2020-04-28
dc.date.submitted2020-06
dc.identifier.citationBock D, Angenete E, Asplund D, et al. Do negative intrusive thoughts at diagnosis predict impaired quality of life, depressed mood and waking up with anxiety 3, 12 and 24 months after radical prostatectomy? - a longitudinal study [published online ahead of print, 2020 Apr 28]. Scand J Urol. 2020;1-7. doi:10.1080/21681805.2020.1754905en_US
dc.identifier.pmid32343155
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/21681805.2020.1754905
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/621449
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article, please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field or click on the hyperlink at the top of the page marked Downloaden_US
dc.description.abstractObjective: To evaluate the effect of intrusive thoughts at diagnosis on quality of life, depressed mood and waking up with anxiety up to two years after radical prostatectomy.Method: The Laparoscopic Prostatectomy Robot Open (LAPPRO) trial was a prospective, longitudinal multicenter study of 4003 patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. Questionnaire data were collected preoperatively, at 3, 12 and 24 months after surgery.Results: The group of patients with intrusive thoughts at diagnosis had a statistically significant higher postoperative prevalence of impaired quality of life, depressed mood and waking up with anxiety as compared with the group of patients with no or minor intrusive thoughts. The highest risk increase for impaired QoL, depressed mood and waking up with anxiety ≥1/week was at 12, 3 and 3 months, respectively, where the three outcomes increased by 38% (RR: 1.38; 95%CI: 1.27-1.49)), 136% (RR: 2.36; 95%CI: 1.74-3.19)) and 165% (RR: 2.65; 95%CI: 2.22-3.17)), respectively.Conclusions: The demonstrated link between intrusive thoughts and quality of life, depressed mood and waking up with anxiety deliver is further evidence to the idea that intrusive thoughts has potential as an endpoint for assessing and predicting psychological distress among men with prostate cancer diagnosis.Trial registration number: ISRCTN06393679 (www.isrctn.com). Date of registration: 07/02/2008. Retrospectively registered.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSwedish Cancer Society Swedish Research Council ALF grants Mrs. Mary von Sydow Foundation Anna and Edvin Berger Foundation Assar Gabrielsson's Foundationen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/21681805.2020.1754905en_US
dc.subjectIntrusive thoughtsen_US
dc.subjectprostate canceren_US
dc.subjectquality of lifeen_US
dc.subjectBlöðruhálskirtilskrabbameinen_US
dc.subjectLífsgæðien_US
dc.subject.meshProstatic Neoplasmsen_US
dc.subject.meshQuality of Lifeen_US
dc.titleDo negative intrusive thoughts at diagnosis predict impaired quality of life, depressed mood and waking up with anxiety 3, 12 and 24 months after radical prostatectomy? - a longitudinal study.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn2168-1813
dc.contributor.department1Department of Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, SSORG - Scandinavian Surgical Outcomes Research Group, Gothenburg, Sweden. 2School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. 3Department of Surgery, Region Västra Götaland, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Östra, Gothenburg, Sweden. 4Department of Urology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. 5Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Section of Urology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. 6Department of Urology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. 7Department of Social Work, Göteborg University, Gothenburg, Sweden. 8Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Health System, New York City, NY, US. 9Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. 10Department of Surgery, NU-hospital Organization, Trollhättan, Sweden. 11Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. 12Faculty of Nursing, Landspitali the National University Hospital and University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.en_US
dc.identifier.journalScandinavian journal of urologyen_US
dc.rights.accessOpen Access - Opinn aðganguren_US
dc.departmentcodeEAN12
dc.source.journaltitleScandinavian journal of urology
dc.source.beginpage1
dc.source.endpage7
refterms.dateFOA2020-06-22T10:44:54Z
dc.source.countryEngland


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