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dc.contributor.authorDoherty, T Mark
dc.contributor.authorHausdorff, William P
dc.contributor.authorKristinsson, Karl G
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-26T15:42:11Z
dc.date.available2020-08-26T15:42:11Z
dc.date.issued2020-06-29
dc.date.submitted2020-08
dc.identifier.citationDoherty TM, Hausdorff WP, Kristinsson KG. Effect of vaccination on the use of antimicrobial agents: a systematic literature review. Ann Med. 2020;52(6):283-299. doi:10.1080/07853890.2020.1782460en_US
dc.identifier.pmid32597236
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/07853890.2020.1782460
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/621492
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article, please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field or click on the hyperlink at the top of the page marked Downloaden_US
dc.description.abstractBackground: Antimicrobial resistance is a growing global health threat. To preserve the effectiveness of antimicrobials, it is important to reduce demand for antimicrobials. Objectives: The objective of the study was to screen the existing peer-reviewed literature to identify articles that addressed the potential impact of influenza or Pneumococcus vaccination on antibiotic usage. Data sources: PubMed, Embase Study eligibility criteria: Clinical studies where antimicrobial prescribing was assessed in both vaccinated and unvaccinated populations. Participants and interventions: All patient populations were included (infants, children, adults and elderly), where the effects of the intervention (vaccination) was assessed. Results: We identified unique 3638 publications, of which 26 were judged to be of sufficiently high quality to allow the calculation of the potential impact of vaccination. Of these studies 23/26 found a significant reduction in antibiotic use by at least one of the parameters assessed. Limitations: Different measures used to define anti-microbial use, studies typically focus on specific risk groups and most studies are from high-income countries. Conclusions and implications of key findings: Despite the limitations of the review, the evidence indicates that improved coverage with existing vaccines may significantly reduce antimicrobial demand. This suggests it may be a valuable tool for antimicrobial stewardship. Key messages While vaccines against a number of pathogens have been studied for their ability to reduce antimicrobial use, currently only vaccination against influenza or pneumococcus has generated sufficient data for analysis Vaccination against either influenza or pneumococcus significantly reduced overall antimicrobial prescribing rates, both in vaccinated individuals and at a population level Maintaining and expanding vaccination coverage thus appears to be a key tool for antimicrobial stewardship. Keywords: Vaccination; antimicrobial resistance; antimicrobial use; meta-analysis.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipGlaxoSmithKlineen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07853890.2020.1782460en_US
dc.subjectVaccinationen_US
dc.subjectantimicrobial resistanceen_US
dc.subjectantimicrobial useen_US
dc.subjectmeta-analysisen_US
dc.subjectSýklalyfjaónæmien_US
dc.subjectBólusetningaren_US
dc.subject.meshDrug Resistance, Microbialen_US
dc.subject.meshVaccinationen_US
dc.titleEffect of vaccination on the use of antimicrobial agents: a systematic literature review.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.typeOtheren_US
dc.identifier.eissn1365-2060
dc.contributor.department1Global Medical Affairs, GSK, Wavre, Belgium. 2PATH, Washington, DC, USA. 3Faculty of Medicine, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium. 4Department of Clinical Microbiology, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavík, Iceland. 5Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland.en_US
dc.identifier.journalAnnals of medicineen_US
dc.rights.accessOpen Access - Opinn aðganguren_US
dc.departmentcodeBAC12
dc.source.journaltitleAnnals of medicine
dc.source.volume52
dc.source.issue6
dc.source.beginpage283
dc.source.endpage299
refterms.dateFOA2020-08-26T15:42:11Z
dc.source.countryEngland


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