Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSkuladottir, S S
dc.contributor.authorRamel, A
dc.contributor.authorHjaltadottir, I
dc.contributor.authorLauner, L J
dc.contributor.authorCotch, M F
dc.contributor.authorSiggeirsdottir, K
dc.contributor.authorGudnason, V
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, G
dc.contributor.authorSteingrimsdottir, L
dc.contributor.authorHalldorsson, T
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-11T11:37:56Z
dc.date.available2020-09-11T11:37:56Z
dc.date.issued2020-08-18
dc.date.submitted2020-09
dc.identifier.citationSkuladottir SS, Ramel A, Hjaltadottir I, et al. Characteristics of incidence hip fracture cases in older adults participating in the longitudinal AGES-Reykjavik study [published online ahead of print, 2020 Aug 18]. Osteoporos Int. 2020;10.1007/s00198-020-05567-x. doi:10.1007/s00198-020-05567-xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid32808140
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00198-020-05567-x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/621524
dc.descriptionUnited States Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health (NIH) - USA National Institute on Aging Intramural Research Program, the National Eye Institute, USA ZIAEY000401 Hjartavernd (The Icelandic Heart Association) Althingi (Icelandic Parliament) St. Josef's Hospital Fund, Reykjavik, Iceland Landspitali University Hospital Research Fund Icelandic Gerontological Society Research Fund Helga Jonsdottir and Sigurlidi Kristjansson Geriatric Research Funden_US
dc.description.abstractPoor physical function and body composition my partly predict the risk of falls leading to fracture regardless of bone mineral density. Introduction: To examine the relationship between body composition, physical function, and other markers of health with hip fractures in older community-dwelling Icelandic adults. Methods: A prospective cohort of 4782 older adults from the AGES-Reykjavik study. Baseline recruitment took place between 2002 and 2006, and information on hip fractures occurring through 2012 was extracted from clinical records. Using multivariate regression analyses, baseline measures of bone health, physical function, and body composition were compared between those who later experienced hip fractures and to those who did not. Associations with the risk of fractures were quantified using Cox regression. Results: Mean age was 76.3 years at baseline. After adjustment for age, regression showed that male hip fracture cases compared with non-cases had (mean (95% confidence interval)) significantly lower thigh muscle cross-sectional area - 5.6 cm2 (- 10.2, - 1.1), poorer leg strength - 28 N (- 49, - 7), and decreased physical function as measured by longer timed up and go test 1.1 s (0.5, 1.7). After adjustment for age, female cases had, compared with non-cases, lower body mass index - 1.5 kg/m2 (- 2.1, - 0.9), less lean mass - 1.6 kg (- 2.5, - 0.8), thigh muscle cross-sectional area - 4.4 cm2 (- 6.5, - 2.3), and worse leg strength - 16 N (- 25, - 6). These differences largely persisted after further adjustment for bone mineral density (BMD), suggesting that body composition may contribute to the risk of fracture independent of bone health. When examining the association between these same factors and hip fractures using Cox regression, the same conclusions were reached. Conclusions: After accounting for age and BMD, older adults who later experienced a hip fracture had poorer baseline measures of physical function and/or body composition, which may at least partly contribute to the risk of falls leading to fracture. Keywords: Aging; Biomarkers; Body composition; Hip fracture; Physical function.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00198-020-05567-xen_US
dc.subjectAgingen_US
dc.subjectBiomarkersen_US
dc.subjectBody compositionen_US
dc.subjectHip fractureen_US
dc.subjectPhysical functionen_US
dc.subjectMjaðmarbroten_US
dc.subjectBeinbroten_US
dc.subjectBylturen_US
dc.subjectÖldrunen_US
dc.subjectLíkamsástanden_US
dc.subject.meshHip Fracturesen_US
dc.subject.meshAgingen_US
dc.titleCharacteristics of incidence hip fracture cases in older adults participating in the longitudinal AGES-Reykjavik study.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1433-2965
dc.contributor.department1The Icelandic Gerontological Research Institute, Tungata 5, 101, Reykjavik, Iceland. sigrunsskula@gmail.com. 2Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. sigrunsskula@gmail.com. 3Landspitali National University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. sigrunsskula@gmail.com. 4The Icelandic Gerontological Research Institute, Tungata 5, 101, Reykjavik, Iceland. 5Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. 6Landspitali National University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. 7Faculty of Nursing, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. 8Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MA, USA. 9Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Applications, Intramural Research Program, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MA, USA. 10Icelandic Heart Association Research Institute, Kopavogur, Iceland.en_US
dc.identifier.journalOsteoporosis international : a journal established as result of cooperation between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USAen_US
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren_US
dc.departmentcodePER12
dc.departmentcodeNAA12
dc.source.journaltitleOsteoporosis international : a journal established as result of cooperation between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA
dc.source.countryEngland


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record