Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorEgnell, Christina
dc.contributor.authorRanta, Susanna
dc.contributor.authorBanerjee, Joanna
dc.contributor.authorMerker, Andrea
dc.contributor.authorNiinimäki, Riitta
dc.contributor.authorLund, Bendik
dc.contributor.authorMogensen, Pernille Rudebeck
dc.contributor.authorJonsson, Ólafur G
dc.contributor.authorVaitkeviciene, Goda
dc.contributor.authorLepik, Kristi
dc.contributor.authorForslund, Anders
dc.contributor.authorHeyman, Mats
dc.contributor.authorHarila-Saari, Arja
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-20T13:01:11Z
dc.date.available2020-11-20T13:01:11Z
dc.date.issued2020-09-20
dc.date.submitted2020-11
dc.identifier.citationEgnell C, Ranta S, Banerjee J, Merker A, Niinimäki R, Lund B, Mogensen PR, Jonsson ÓG, Vaitkeviciene G, Lepik K, Forslund A, Heyman M, Harila-Saari A. Impact of body mass index on relapse in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated according to Nordic treatment protocols. Eur J Haematol. 2020 Dec;105(6):797-807. doi: 10.1111/ejh.13517en_US
dc.identifier.pmid32909636
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ejh.13517
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/621570
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article, please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field or click on the hyperlink at the top of the page marked Downloaden_US
dc.description.abstractObjectives: High body mass index (BMI) is associated with poorer survival in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), but the actual impact on the risk of relapse still needs to be clarified. We evaluated the impact of BMI at diagnosis on the risk of relapse in children with ALL treated according to Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (NOPHO) protocols. Method: In a multicenter study, we collected data on BMI at diagnosis and outcome of 2558 children aged 2.0-17.9 years diagnosed between 1992 and 2016. Patients were divided into four groups according to International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) childhood BMI cut-offs: underweight, <17; healthy weight, 17-25; overweight, 25-30; and obese, ≥30 kg/m2 . Results: In Cox multivariate regression analyses, an increased risk of relapse was observed in children aged 10-17.9 years with unhealthy BMI at diagnosis (underweight hazard ratio HR: 2.90 [95% confidence interval: 1.24-6.78], P = .01; overweight, HR: 1.95 [1.11-3.43], P = .02, and obese HR: 4.32 [95% 2.08-8.97], P < .001), compared to children with healthy weight. BMI had no impact on relapse in children under 10 years of age. Conclusion: High BMI, and especially obesity at diagnosis, is an independent adverse prognostic factor for relapse in older children with ALL. Keywords: acute lymphoblastic leukemia; body mass index; children; obesity; survival.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipBarncancerfondenen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ejh.13517en_US
dc.rights© 2020 The Authors. European Journal of Haematology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
dc.subjectacute lymphoblastic leukemiaen_US
dc.subjectbody mass indexen_US
dc.subjectchildrenen_US
dc.subjectobesityen_US
dc.subjectsurvivalen_US
dc.subjectBráðahvítblæðien_US
dc.subjectBörnen_US
dc.subjectLíkamsþyngdarstuðullen_US
dc.subject.meshPrecursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphomaen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_US
dc.titleImpact of body mass index on relapse in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated according to Nordic treatment protocols.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1600-0609
dc.contributor.department1Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. 2Department of Pediatric Oncology, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. 3Children and Adolescents Department, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. 4PEDEGO Research Unit, Medical Research Center Oulu and Department of Children and Adolescents, Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. 5Department of Pediatrics, St. Olavs University Hospital, and the Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. 6Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. 7Children's Hospital, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. 8Children's Hospital, Affiliate of Vilnius University Hospital Santaros Klinikos and Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania. 9Department of Haematology and Oncology, Tallin Children's Hospital, Tallin, Estonia. 10Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.en_US
dc.identifier.journalEuropean journal of haematologyen_US
dc.rights.accessOpen Access - Opinn aðganguren_US
dc.departmentcodePED12
dc.source.journaltitleEuropean journal of haematology
dc.source.volume105
dc.source.issue6
dc.source.beginpage797
dc.source.endpage807
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-20T13:01:11Z
dc.source.countryEngland


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Impact ....pdf
Size:
483.9Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record