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dc.contributor.authorHardardottir, Hronn
dc.contributor.authorAspelund, Thor
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Jianwei
dc.contributor.authorFall, Katja
dc.contributor.authorHauksdottir, Arna
dc.contributor.authorFang, Fang
dc.contributor.authorLu, Donghao
dc.contributor.authorJanson, Christer
dc.contributor.authorJonsson, Steinn
dc.contributor.authorValdimarsdottir, Heiddis
dc.contributor.authorValdimarsdottir, Unnur A
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-20T13:41:14Z
dc.date.available2021-10-20T13:41:14Z
dc.date.issued2021-07-17
dc.date.submitted2021-10
dc.identifier.citationHardardottir H, Aspelund T, Zhu J, Fall K, Hauksdottir A, Fang F, Lu D, Janson C, Jonsson S, Valdimarsdottir H, Valdimarsdottir UA. Optimal communication associated with lower risk of acute traumatic stress after lung cancer diagnosis. Support Care Cancer. 2021 Jul 17. doi: 10.1007/s00520-021-06138-4.en_US
dc.identifier.pmid34273032
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00520-021-06138-4
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/621913
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink belowen_US
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The aim of this study was to assess the role of the patient's background and perceived healthcare-related factors in symptoms of acute stress after lung cancer diagnosis. Methods: The study population consisted of 89 individuals referred for diagnostic work-up at Landspitali National University Hospital in Iceland and subsequently diagnosed with lung cancer. Before diagnosis, the patients completed questionnaires on sociodemographic characteristics, pre-diagnostic distress (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), social support, and resilience. At a median of 16 days after diagnosis, the patients reported symptoms of acute stress on the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) and experience of communication and support from healthcare professionals and family during the diagnostic period. Results: Patients were on average 68 years and 52% reported high levels of post-diagnostic acute stress (IES-R > 23) while 24% reported symptoms suggestive of clinical significance (IES-R > 32). Prior history of cancer (β = 6.7, 95% CI: 0.1 to 13.3) and pre-diagnostic distress were associated with higher levels of post-diagnostic acute stress (β = 8.8, 95% CI: 2.7 to 14.9), while high educational level (β = - 7.9, 95% CI: - 14.8 to - 1.1) was associated with lower levels. Controlling for the abovementioned factors, the patients' perception of optimal doctor-patient (β = - 9.1, 95% CI: - 14.9 to - 3.3) and family communication (β = - 8.6, 95% CI: - 14.3 to - 2.9) was inversely associated with levels of post-diagnostic acute stress after lung cancer diagnosis. Conclusions: A high proportion of patients with newly diagnosed lung cancer experience high levels of acute traumatic stress of potential clinical significance. Efforts to improve doctor-patient and family communication may mitigate the risk of these adverse symptoms. Keywords: Doctor-patient communication; Lung cancer diagnosis; Post-diagnostic acute stress; Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); Prospective cohort study.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipRannis Research Fund Swedish Cancer Foundation University of Iceland Research Fund/Eimskip University Fund 2018 Landspitali University Hospital Research Fund 2015en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00520-021-06138-4en_US
dc.rights© 2021. The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature.
dc.subjectDoctor-patient communicationen_US
dc.subjectLung cancer diagnosisen_US
dc.subjectPost-diagnostic acute stressen_US
dc.subjectPosttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)en_US
dc.subjectProspective cohort studyen_US
dc.subject.meshLung Neoplasmsen_US
dc.subject.meshDiagnosisen_US
dc.subject.meshStress Disorders, Post-Traumaticen_US
dc.subject.meshPhysician-Patient Relationsen_US
dc.titleOptimal communication associated with lower risk of acute traumatic stress after lung cancer diagnosis.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1433-7339
dc.contributor.department1Department of Respiratory Medicine, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. hronnh@landspitali.is. 2Centre of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. hronnh@landspitali.is. 3Centre of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. 4Department of Medical Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. 5Department of Orthopedic Surgery, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610000, Sichuan Province, China. 6Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden. 7Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. 8Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. 9Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. 10Respiratory, Allergy and Sleep Research, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. 11Department of Respiratory Medicine, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. 12Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. 13Department of Psychology, Reykjavík University, Reykjavik, Iceland. 14Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA.en_US
dc.identifier.journalSupportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Canceren_US
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren_US
dc.departmentcodePAD12
dc.source.journaltitleSupportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer
dc.source.countryGermany


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