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dc.contributor.authorYngve, Agneta
dc.contributor.authorHambraeus, Leif
dc.contributor.authorLissner, Lauren
dc.contributor.authorSerra Majem, Lluis
dc.contributor.authorVaz de Almeida, Maria Daniel
dc.contributor.authorBerg, Christina
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Roger
dc.contributor.authorCannon, Geoffrey
dc.contributor.authorThorsdottir, Inga
dc.contributor.authorKearney, John
dc.contributor.authorGustafsson, Jan-Ake
dc.contributor.authorRafter, Joseph
dc.contributor.authorElmadfa, Ibrahim
dc.contributor.authorKennedy, Nick
dc.date.accessioned2006-12-11T12:10:19Z
dc.date.available2006-12-11T12:10:19Z
dc.date.issued2006-04-01
dc.date.submitted2006
dc.identifier.citationPublic Health Nutr 2006, 9(2):269-72en
dc.identifier.issn1368-9800
dc.identifier.pmid16571183
dc.identifier.doi10.1079/PHN2006952
dc.identifier.otherNUR12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/6483
dc.description.abstractThe first results of the Women's Health Initiative dietary intervention trial were published in the USA in February. This is a colossal intervention designed to see if diets lower in fat and higher in fruits, vegetables and grains than is usual in high-income countries reduce the incidence of breast cancer, colorectal cancer, heart disease and other chronic diseases, in women aged 50-79 years. As interpreted by US government media releases, the results were unimpressive. As interpreted by a global media blitz, the results indicate that food and nutrition has little or nothing to do with health and disease. But the trial was in key respects not reaching its aims, was methodologically controversial, and in any case has not produced the reported null results. What should the public health nutrition profession do about such messes?
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPublished on behalf of the Nutrition Society by CAB Internationalen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1079/PHN2006952
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshBreast Neoplasmsen
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshChronic Diseaseen
dc.subject.meshColonic Neoplasmsen
dc.subject.meshEpidemiologic Studiesen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshLongitudinal Studiesen
dc.subject.meshMass Mediaen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshNutritionen
dc.subject.meshPostmenopauseen
dc.subject.meshPublic Healthen
dc.subject.meshWomen's Healthen
dc.titleThe Women's Health Initiative. What is on trial: nutrition and chronic disease? Or misinterpreted science, media havoc and the sound of silence from peers?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalPublic health nutritionen
dc.format.digYES
html.description.abstractThe first results of the Women's Health Initiative dietary intervention trial were published in the USA in February. This is a colossal intervention designed to see if diets lower in fat and higher in fruits, vegetables and grains than is usual in high-income countries reduce the incidence of breast cancer, colorectal cancer, heart disease and other chronic diseases, in women aged 50-79 years. As interpreted by US government media releases, the results were unimpressive. As interpreted by a global media blitz, the results indicate that food and nutrition has little or nothing to do with health and disease. But the trial was in key respects not reaching its aims, was methodologically controversial, and in any case has not produced the reported null results. What should the public health nutrition profession do about such messes?


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