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dc.contributor.authorThrainsdottir, S
dc.contributor.authorMalik, R A
dc.contributor.authorRosén, I
dc.contributor.authorJakobsson, F
dc.contributor.authorBakhtadze, E
dc.contributor.authorPetersson, J
dc.contributor.authorSundkvist, G
dc.contributor.authorDahlin, L B
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-13T15:53:09Z
dc.date.available2009-07-13T15:53:09Z
dc.date.issued2009-07-01
dc.date.submitted2009-07-13
dc.identifier.citationActa Neurol. Scand. 2009, 120(1):38-46en
dc.identifier.issn1600-0404
dc.identifier.pmid19154542
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0404.2008.01118.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/73573
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Sural nerve pathology in peripheral neuropathy shows correlation with clinical findings and neurophysiological tests. The aim was to investigate progression of nerve dysfunction over time in relation to a baseline nerve biopsy. METHODS: Baseline myelinated nerve fiber density (MNFD) was assessed in sural nerve biopsies from 10 men with type 2 diabetes, 10 with impaired and 10 with normal glucose tolerance. Nerve conduction and quantitative perception thresholds were estimated at baseline and follow-up (7-10 years later). RESULTS: Subjects with low MNFD (< or = 4700 fibers/mm(2)) showed decline of peroneal amplitude (P < 0.02) and conduction velocity (P < 0.04), as well as median nerve sensory amplitude (P < 0.05) and motor conduction velocity (P < 0.04) from baseline to follow-up. In linear regression analyses, diabetes influenced decline of nerve conduction. MNFD correlated negatively with body mass index (r = -0.469; P < 0.02). CONCLUSION: Low MNFD may predict progression of neurophysiological dysfunction and links obesity to myelinated nerve fiber loss.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0404.2008.01118.xen
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus, Type 2en
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen
dc.titleSural nerve biopsy may predict future nerve dysfunctionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Clinical Sciences and Neurology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. soleyth@landspitali.isen
dc.identifier.journalActa neurologica Scandinavicaen
html.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Sural nerve pathology in peripheral neuropathy shows correlation with clinical findings and neurophysiological tests. The aim was to investigate progression of nerve dysfunction over time in relation to a baseline nerve biopsy. METHODS: Baseline myelinated nerve fiber density (MNFD) was assessed in sural nerve biopsies from 10 men with type 2 diabetes, 10 with impaired and 10 with normal glucose tolerance. Nerve conduction and quantitative perception thresholds were estimated at baseline and follow-up (7-10 years later). RESULTS: Subjects with low MNFD (< or = 4700 fibers/mm(2)) showed decline of peroneal amplitude (P < 0.02) and conduction velocity (P < 0.04), as well as median nerve sensory amplitude (P < 0.05) and motor conduction velocity (P < 0.04) from baseline to follow-up. In linear regression analyses, diabetes influenced decline of nerve conduction. MNFD correlated negatively with body mass index (r = -0.469; P < 0.02). CONCLUSION: Low MNFD may predict progression of neurophysiological dysfunction and links obesity to myelinated nerve fiber loss.


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