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dc.contributor.authorKristinsson, Jakob
dc.contributor.authorPalsson, Runolfur
dc.contributor.authorGudjonsdottir, Gudborg A
dc.contributor.authorBlondal, Margret
dc.contributor.authorGudmundsson, Sigurdur
dc.contributor.authorSnook, Curtis P
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-17T14:58:12Z
dc.date.available2009-07-17T14:58:12Z
dc.date.issued2008-02-01
dc.date.submitted2009-07-17
dc.identifier.citationClin Toxicol (Phila). 2008, 46(2):126-32en
dc.identifier.issn1556-3650
dc.identifier.pmid18259960
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/15563650701438268
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/74373
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: Poisoning is a common cause of emergency visits and hospital admission in Western countries. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence and type of toxic exposures presenting to emergency medical facilities in Iceland. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was prospective and included all patients with confirmed or suspected poisoning presenting to hospitals and rural medical centers providing emergency services in Iceland during the twelve-month period from April 2001 until March 2002. RESULTS: A total of 1,121 toxic exposures were documented representing an incidence of 3.91 cases per 1,000 inhabitants per year. The female to male ratio was 1.23. The majority of exposures (56.7%) occurred in the patient's home, 60% were deliberate, 72% had drugs and/or alcohol as their main cause, and 11% involved illicit drugs. Exposures to chemicals other than drugs were usually unintentional. CONCLUSION: Toxic exposures requiring emergency medical care are common in Iceland. Self-poisonings by ingestion of prescription drugs and/or alcohol accounted for the majority of cases.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInforma Healthcareen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15563650701438268en
dc.subject.meshAcute Diseaseen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen
dc.subject.meshAlcoholic Beveragesen
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen
dc.subject.meshCircadian Rhythmen
dc.subject.meshCounselingen
dc.subject.meshData Collectionen
dc.subject.meshEmergency Service, Hospitalen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHazardous Substancesen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshPatient Admissionen
dc.subject.meshPoison Control Centersen
dc.subject.meshPoisoningen
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen
dc.subject.meshRural Health Servicesen
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen
dc.subject.meshSuicide, Attempteden
dc.titleAcute poisonings in Iceland: a prospective nationwide studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute of Pharmacy, Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.en
dc.identifier.journalClinical toxicology (Philadelphia, Pa.)en
html.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: Poisoning is a common cause of emergency visits and hospital admission in Western countries. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence and type of toxic exposures presenting to emergency medical facilities in Iceland. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was prospective and included all patients with confirmed or suspected poisoning presenting to hospitals and rural medical centers providing emergency services in Iceland during the twelve-month period from April 2001 until March 2002. RESULTS: A total of 1,121 toxic exposures were documented representing an incidence of 3.91 cases per 1,000 inhabitants per year. The female to male ratio was 1.23. The majority of exposures (56.7%) occurred in the patient's home, 60% were deliberate, 72% had drugs and/or alcohol as their main cause, and 11% involved illicit drugs. Exposures to chemicals other than drugs were usually unintentional. CONCLUSION: Toxic exposures requiring emergency medical care are common in Iceland. Self-poisonings by ingestion of prescription drugs and/or alcohol accounted for the majority of cases.


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