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dc.contributor.authorSigurður Ragnarsson
dc.contributor.authorLovísa Leifsdóttir
dc.contributor.authorFredrick Kapinga
dc.contributor.authorGeir Gunnlaugsson
dc.date.accessioned2007-02-22T14:06:30Z
dc.date.available2007-02-22T14:06:30Z
dc.date.issued2006-04-01
dc.date.submitted2007-02-22
dc.identifier.citationLæknablaðið 2006, 92(4):271-9en
dc.identifier.issn0023-7213
dc.identifier.pmid16582455
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/8746
dc.descriptionHægt er að lesa greinina í heild sinni með því að smella á hlekkinn View/Openen
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: Examine primary health care services for ill children in a sub-Saharan African country, assess the appropriateness of the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) in such a setting and evaluate its implementation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was carried out in March, 2005 in the Monkey Bay area, Malawi, in two state-run health facilities that provide services free of charge and in three privately run facilities that charge user fees. Data was collected from each facility regarding all out-patient visits but in particular of children under five years of age (U5s). Interviews were conducted with health workers and drug inventories were carried out in the facilities. RESULTS: Eight out of 10 health workers were trained in IMCI. It was 1.22 times more likely (RR, 95% CI 1.18-1.26) that U5s were brought to a state-run facility than a private one. Around 4/5 of all disease classifications during the research period are dealt with in the IMCI. About half of U5s were classified with malaria, 28% with other respiratory infections, 6% with pneumonia, and 5% with diarrhoea. Most IMCI-recommended drugs were in stock at the time of inspection but all facilities lacked at least one recommended drug. CONCLUSION: Results show that IMCI reaches the periphery of the health care system in a low-income country such as Malawi. They confirm that IMCI deals with the majority of diseases affecting U5s in such a setting. User fees seem to influence health care seeking behaviour. It is important to support and strengthen health services for ill children in the area, support continuous education of staff and ensure availability of drugs and equipment.
dc.format.extent278628 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageiceen
dc.language.isoisen
dc.publisherLæknafélag Íslands, Læknafélag Reykjavíkuren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.laeknabladid.is/2006/04/nr/2303en
dc.subjectAfríkaen
dc.subjectMalavíen
dc.subjectHeilsugæslaen
dc.subjectHeilbrigðisþjónustaen
dc.subjectÞjónustugjölden
dc.subject.classificationLBL12en
dc.subject.classificationFræðigreinaren
dc.subject.meshChild Health Servicesen
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen
dc.subject.meshDiarrheaen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHealth Personnelen
dc.subject.meshMalariaen
dc.subject.meshMalawi/epidemiologyen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshPneumoniaen
dc.subject.meshPrimary Health Careen
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Tract Infectionsen
dc.titleHeilbrigðisþjónusta við veik börn með IMCI vinnuferlum í Monkey Bay, Malavíen
dc.title.alternativeHealth services for children and the implementation of IMCI in Monkey Bay, Malawien
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalLæknablaðiðis
dc.format.digYES
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-12T19:02:25Z
html.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: Examine primary health care services for ill children in a sub-Saharan African country, assess the appropriateness of the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) in such a setting and evaluate its implementation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was carried out in March, 2005 in the Monkey Bay area, Malawi, in two state-run health facilities that provide services free of charge and in three privately run facilities that charge user fees. Data was collected from each facility regarding all out-patient visits but in particular of children under five years of age (U5s). Interviews were conducted with health workers and drug inventories were carried out in the facilities. RESULTS: Eight out of 10 health workers were trained in IMCI. It was 1.22 times more likely (RR, 95% CI 1.18-1.26) that U5s were brought to a state-run facility than a private one. Around 4/5 of all disease classifications during the research period are dealt with in the IMCI. About half of U5s were classified with malaria, 28% with other respiratory infections, 6% with pneumonia, and 5% with diarrhoea. Most IMCI-recommended drugs were in stock at the time of inspection but all facilities lacked at least one recommended drug. CONCLUSION: Results show that IMCI reaches the periphery of the health care system in a low-income country such as Malawi. They confirm that IMCI deals with the majority of diseases affecting U5s in such a setting. User fees seem to influence health care seeking behaviour. It is important to support and strengthen health services for ill children in the area, support continuous education of staff and ensure availability of drugs and equipment.


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