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dc.contributor.authorTomasson, K
dc.contributor.authorVaglum, P
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-02T13:32:43Z
dc.date.available2010-03-02T13:32:43Z
dc.date.issued1998-03-01
dc.date.submitted2010-03-01
dc.identifier.citationScand J Soc Med. 1998, 26(1):63-70en
dc.identifier.issn0300-8037
dc.identifier.pmid9526766
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/14034948980260010101
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/93393
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractThis is both a retrospective and a 16 and 28 months prospective study of the association between psychiatric comorbidity and social consequences (accidents, fights, broken relationships, drunken driving arrest, and reduced employment) related to alcohol in a nation-wide sample (n = 351) of substance abusers seeking inpatient treatment. Psychiatric comorbidity was evaluated with the Diagnostic Interview Schedule, while drinking history and social consequences were assessed with a structured questionnaire. The social consequences had a high rate of re-occurrence. Controlled for alcohol consumption, polysubstance abuse predicted accidents (OR = 2.9) and fights (OR = 3.9) among men, while among pure alcoholics of both sexes phobia (OR = 4.3) and antisocial personality disorder (OR = 3.0) predicted fights. Only level of abuse predicted broken relationships. Antisocials had most drunken driving arrests. Attempts to reduce these social consequences should aim at treating polysubstance abuse, phobia, and antisocial personality disorder. However, the overriding aim should be the promotion of abstinence.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherScandinavian University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/14034948980260010101en
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAlcoholismen
dc.subject.meshComorbidityen
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMental Disordersen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshPatient Admissionen
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.subject.meshSocial Problemsen
dc.subject.meshSubstance-Related Disordersen
dc.titleSocial consequences of substance abuse: the impact of comorbid psychiatric disorders. A prospective study of a nation-wide sample of treatment-seeking patientsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry, National University Hospital, Reykjavík, Iceland.en
dc.identifier.journalScandinavian journal of social medicineen
html.description.abstractThis is both a retrospective and a 16 and 28 months prospective study of the association between psychiatric comorbidity and social consequences (accidents, fights, broken relationships, drunken driving arrest, and reduced employment) related to alcohol in a nation-wide sample (n = 351) of substance abusers seeking inpatient treatment. Psychiatric comorbidity was evaluated with the Diagnostic Interview Schedule, while drinking history and social consequences were assessed with a structured questionnaire. The social consequences had a high rate of re-occurrence. Controlled for alcohol consumption, polysubstance abuse predicted accidents (OR = 2.9) and fights (OR = 3.9) among men, while among pure alcoholics of both sexes phobia (OR = 4.3) and antisocial personality disorder (OR = 3.0) predicted fights. Only level of abuse predicted broken relationships. Antisocials had most drunken driving arrests. Attempts to reduce these social consequences should aim at treating polysubstance abuse, phobia, and antisocial personality disorder. However, the overriding aim should be the promotion of abstinence.


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