Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorFolkesson, Joakim
dc.contributor.authorEngholm, Gerda
dc.contributor.authorEhrnrooth, Eva
dc.contributor.authorKejs, Anne-Mette
dc.contributor.authorPåhlman, Lars
dc.contributor.authorHarling, Henrik
dc.contributor.authorWibe, Arne
dc.contributor.authorGaard, Maria
dc.contributor.authorThornorvaldur, Jonsson
dc.contributor.authorTryggvadottir, Laufey
dc.contributor.authorBrewster, David H
dc.contributor.authorHakulinen, Timo
dc.contributor.authorStorm, Hans H
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-18T14:54:25Z
dc.date.available2010-05-18T14:54:25Z
dc.date.issued2009-11-15
dc.date.submitted2010-05-18
dc.identifier.citationInt. J. Cancer. 2009, 125(10):2406-12en
dc.identifier.issn1097-0215
dc.identifier.pmid19588486
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ijc.24562
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/99131
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to present detailed population-based survival estimates for patients with a rectal adenocarcinoma, using cancer register data supplemented with clinical data. Based on cancer register data, differences in rectal cancer survival have been reported between countries in Europe. Variation in the distribution of stage at diagnosis, initial therapy including surgical technique, and comorbidity are possible explanatory factors. Adenocarcinomas in the rectum, diagnosed in 1997 and identified in the national cancer registries in the Nordic countries and Scotland were included. Age standardized 5-year relative survival and multiplicative regression models for the relative excess mortality were calculated. 3888 patients were included in the survival study. Men in Denmark, Finland and Iceland had lower 5-year relative survival and poorer stage distribution compared to Norway, Sweden and Scotland. Danish men had the highest rate of excess deaths in the first six months after diagnosis. Stage adjusted, the elevated relative excess mortality decreased and after six months the excess mortality rates were the same in all countries. The poor 5-year relative survival in Danish men was mainly due to a high excess rate of death during the first six months after diagnosis. The low survival in Finland and Iceland was not in accordance with other periods. For both countries this may be explained by random variation due to small numbers. The study emphasizes the need for high quality and detailed data in order to understand international survival differences, and cautions comparisons between large national samples and those of smaller areas.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.24562en
dc.subject.meshAdenocarcinomaen
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshPrognosisen
dc.subject.meshRectal Neoplasmsen
dc.subject.meshScandinaviaen
dc.subject.meshScotlanden
dc.subject.meshSurvival Rateen
dc.titleRectal cancer survival in the Nordic countries and Scotlanden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. joakim.folkesson@surgsci.uu.seen
dc.identifier.journalInternational journal of cancer. Journal international du canceren
html.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to present detailed population-based survival estimates for patients with a rectal adenocarcinoma, using cancer register data supplemented with clinical data. Based on cancer register data, differences in rectal cancer survival have been reported between countries in Europe. Variation in the distribution of stage at diagnosis, initial therapy including surgical technique, and comorbidity are possible explanatory factors. Adenocarcinomas in the rectum, diagnosed in 1997 and identified in the national cancer registries in the Nordic countries and Scotland were included. Age standardized 5-year relative survival and multiplicative regression models for the relative excess mortality were calculated. 3888 patients were included in the survival study. Men in Denmark, Finland and Iceland had lower 5-year relative survival and poorer stage distribution compared to Norway, Sweden and Scotland. Danish men had the highest rate of excess deaths in the first six months after diagnosis. Stage adjusted, the elevated relative excess mortality decreased and after six months the excess mortality rates were the same in all countries. The poor 5-year relative survival in Danish men was mainly due to a high excess rate of death during the first six months after diagnosis. The low survival in Finland and Iceland was not in accordance with other periods. For both countries this may be explained by random variation due to small numbers. The study emphasizes the need for high quality and detailed data in order to understand international survival differences, and cautions comparisons between large national samples and those of smaller areas.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record