Welcome to Hirsla, Landspítali University Hospital research archive

Hirsla is an open access repository, designed as a place to store, index, preserve and redistribute in digital format scholarly work of Landspitali employees. (A/H1N1)

  • Following the genetic clues towards treatment of hand OA.

    Jonsson, Helgi; Landspitali University Hospital, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. helgi@hi.is. (Nature Pub. Group, 2018-09-01)
  • Accidental injuries among older adults: An incidence study.

    Gudnadottir, Maria; Thorsteinsdottir, Thordis Katrin; Mogensen, Brynjolfur; Aspelund, Thor; Thordardottir, Edda Bjork; 1 Centre of Public Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. Electronic address: maria.gudnadottir@gmail.com. 2 Research Institute in Emergency Care, Landspitali, The National University Hospital of Iceland, Iceland; Faculty of Nursing, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. Electronic address: thordith@landspitali.is. 3 Research Institute in Emergency Care, Landspitali, The National University Hospital of Iceland, Iceland; Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. Electronic address: brynmog@landspitali.is. 4 Centre of Public Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland; Icelandic Heart Association, Iceland. Electronic address: thor@hi.is. 5 Centre of Public Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. Electronic address: eddat@hi.is. (Elsevier, 2018-01-01)
    To date, the majority of studies assessing accidental injuries among the elderly have focused on fall injuries, while studies of other mechanisms of injuries have been lacking. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to investigate all injury-related visits among older adults to an emergency department and risk factors for injuries. Data were collected on all registered visits of adults, ≥67 years old, living in the capital of Iceland, to the emergency department of Landspitali, the National University Hospital, in 2011 and 2012. The yearly incidence rate for injuries was 106 per 1000 adults, ≥67 years old. Of all injuries (n = 4,469), falls were the most common mechanism of injury (78 per 1000), followed by being struck or hit (12 per 1000) and being crushed, cut or pierced (8 per 1000). Other mechanisms of injury, such as acute overexertion, foreign body in natural orifice, injuries caused by thermal and chemical effect and other and unspecified mechanism were less common (8 per 1000). Fractures were the most common consequences of injuries (36 per 1000). The most frequent place of injury was in or around homes (77 per 1000), with men being more likely than women to be injured outside of the home (60 per 1000 vs. 36 per 1000). Results indicate that falls are the main cause of accidental injuries, followed by being struck and hit injuries but other causes contributed to the rest. Falls constitute a major public health problem and fall-related injuries can have a substantial impact on the lives of older adults. As life expectancy continues to increase, fall risk is expected to increase. Since falls constitute a major impact on the lives of older adults and can lead to not only declines in physical activity and functional status, but to considerable health care costs, the health care system needs to intervene.
  • Menntun, störf og tækifæri hér og erlendis

    Júlíana Sigurveig Guðjónsdóttir; Agnar Óli Snorrason (Sjúkraliðafélag Íslands, 2018-10)
  • Low rate of reoperations after acute type A aortic dissection repair from The Nordic Consortium Registry.

    Pan, Emily; Gudbjartsson, Tomas; Ahlsson, Anders; Fuglsang, Simon; Geirsson, Arnar; Hansson, Emma C; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Jeppsson, Anders; Järvelä, Kati; Mennander, Ari; Nozohoor, Shahab; Olsson, Christian; Wickbom, Anders; Zindovic, Igor; Gunn, Jarmo; 1 Heart Center, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland; Department of Surgery, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. 2 Landspitali University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. 3 Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Orebro, Sweden; School of Health and Medicine, Orebro University, Orebro, Sweden. 4 Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark. 5 Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. 6 Heart Center, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland; University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. 7 Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Skane University Hospital, Lund, Sweden; Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. 8 Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. 9 Heart Center, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland; Department of Surgery, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. Electronic address: jarmo.gunn@tyks. (MOSBY-ELSEVIER, 2018-09-01)
    To describe the relationship between the extent of primary aortic repair and the incidence of reoperations after surgery for type A aortic dissection. A retrospective cohort of 1159 patients treated for type A aortic dissection at eight Nordic low- to medium-sized cardiothoracic centers from 2005 to 2014. Data were gathered from patient records and national registries. Patients were separately divided into 3 groups according to the distal anastomoses technique (ascending aorta [n = 791], hemiarch [n = 247], and total arch [n = 66]), and into 2 groups for proximal repair (aortic root replacement [n = 285] and supracoronary repair [n = 832]). Freedom from reoperation was estimated with cumulative incidence survival and Fine-Gray competing risk regression model was used to identify independent risk factors for reoperation. The median follow-up was 2.7 years (range, 0-10 years). Altogether 51 out of 911 patients underwent reoperation. Freedom from distal reoperation at 5 years was 96.9%, with no significant difference between the groups (P = .22). Freedom from proximal reoperation at 5 years was 97.8%, with no difference between the groups (P = .84). Neither DeBakey classification nor the extent of proximal or distal repair predicted freedom from a later reoperation. The only independent risk factor associated with a later proximal reoperation was a history of connective tissue disease. Type A aortic dissection repair in low- to medium-volume centers was associated with a low reoperation rate and satisfactory midterm survival. The extent of the primary repair had no significant influence on reoperation rate or midterm survival.
  • Sex differences in the spatial distribution of bone in relation to incident hip fracture: Findings from the AGES-Reykjavik study.

    Marques, Elisa A; Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Aspelund, Thor; Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Launer, Lenore; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Lang, Thomas; Harris, Tamara B; 1 National Institute on Aging, Intramural Research Program, Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA. Electronic address: emarques@ismai.pt. 2 Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO, USA. 3 Icelandic Heart Association Research Institute, Kópavogur, Iceland; University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. 4 Icelandic Heart Association Research Institute, Kópavogur, Iceland; University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland; Landspitalinn University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. 5 Icelandic Heart Association Research Institute, Kópavogur, Iceland. 6 Icelandic Heart Association Research Institute, Kópavogur, Iceland; Centre of Public Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. 7 National Institute on Aging, Intramural Research Program, Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA. 8 Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. (Elsevier Science, 2018-09-01)
    In this case-cohort study, we used data-driven computational anatomy approaches to assess within and between sex spatial differences in proximal femoral bone characteristics in relation to incident hip fracture. One hundred male and 234 female incident hip fracture cases, and 1047 randomly selected noncase subcohort participants (562 female) were chosen from the population-based AGES-Reykjavik study (mean age of 77 years). The baseline -i.e. before hip fracture- hip quantitative computed tomography scans of these subjects were analyzed using voxel-based morphometry, tensor-based morphometry, and surface-based statistical parametric mapping to assess the spatial distribution of volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), internal structure, and cortical bone properties (thickness, vBMD and trabecular vBMD adjacent to the endosteal surface) of the proximal femur, respectively, in relation to incident hip fracture. Results showed that in both men and women: 1) the superior aspect of the femoral neck and the trochanteric region (except for cortical bone thickness) were consistently identified as being associated with incident hip fracture, and 2) differences in bone properties between noncases and incident hip fracture cases followed similar trends, were located at compatible regions, and manifested heterogeneity in the spatial distribution of their magnitude with focal regions showing larger differences. With respect to sex differences, most of the regions with a significant interaction between fracture group and sex showed: 1) differences of greater magnitude in men between noncases and incident hip fracture cases with different spatial distributions for all bone properties with the exception of cortical bone thickness, and 2) that while most of these regions showed better bone quality in male cases than in female cases, female cases showed higher vBMD in the principal compressive group and higher endotrabecular vBMD at several regions including the anterior, posterior, and lateral aspects of the proximal femur. These findings indicate the value of these image analysis techniques by providing unique information about the specific patterns of bone deterioration associated with incident hip fracture and their sex differences, highlighting the importance of looking to men and women separately in the assessment of hip fracture risk.

View more